March 4, 2013
Dennis Rodman. (Andy Wong/The Associated Press)

Following his epic interview with George Stephanopoulos on ABC News’s “This Week,” Dennis Rodman, fresh off of his news-making jaunt to North Korea to meet with dictator Kim Jong Un, has gone on media appearance-cancellation binge. TVNewser is reporting that the former Chicago Bulls star has pulled out of dates with both ESPN and CNN.

On Fox News’s program “The Five” this afternoon, host Eric Bolling asked, “Do we want our Sunday shows — Dennis Rodman sitting there with George Stephanopoulos?”

No! Unless, of course, Dennis Rodman is fresh off of a news-making trip to North Korea to meet with dictator Kim Jong Un. In that case, we absolutely want Dennis Rodman sitting there with George Stephanopoulos.

Just once, however. The Erik Wemple Blog thanks Rodman for canceling his CNN and ESPN appearances, the better to save us the misery of watching the guy, again, stumble his way through the most basic questions about the United States and North Korea.

1) Like this one: Were you aware of his threats against the United States? To which Rodman replied, in part: “I hate the fact that he’s doing that.”

2) And this one: What about the perceptions that you’re propping up the regime? To which Rodman replied, in part: “The kid’s only 28 years old.”

3) And this one: Do you really believe what you said about how they’re great leaders? To which Rodman replied, in part: “What I saw in that country … I saw people respect him and his family — that’s what I mean about that, great leaders there.”

4) And this one: “He wants a call from President Obama?” To which Rodman replied, in part: “‘I don’t want to do war’ — he said that to me.”

5) And this one: “What did he tell you about America and what did you learn about him?” To which Rodman replied, in part: “He loves basketball. And I said the same thing, I said, ‘Obama loves basketball.’ Let’s start there.”

Never before has a single interview on “This Week” so elevated the profession of diplomacy.

Erik Wemple writes the Erik Wemple blog, where he reports and opines on media organizations of all sorts.
Continue reading