July 10, 2013
Trayvon Martin
Trayvon Martin supporters (Joe Raedle / Getty Images)

As mentioned in a previous post, Fox News host Bill O’Reilly lashed out last night at media over-coverage of the George Zimmerman trial: “There is no way on earth this trial should be getting this much coverage. And the only reason it’s doing it is because it’s a light-skinned Hispanic against a black kid.”

Such words, one might suppose, should come from the mouth of someone who has accorded only the most sparse coverage to the George Zimmerman trial — indeed, someone who has suppressed this non-story in favor of far more important newsfare.

Now for the record, which tells a different story:

Last night, O’Reilly delivered an editorial monologue on the George Zimmerman case; then he discussed it with commentators Kimberly Guilfoyle and Lis Wiehl; then he sat down with another guest, Jacques DeGraff, and talked about it. Much of the discussion concerned race.

On Monday night, O’Reilly discussed the racial aspects of the case with LeVar Burton. In another segment on the same show, he discussed the case with Juan Williams and Mary Katharine Ham. Much of the discussion concerned race.

Last Wednesday night, O’Reilly convened a panel with Wiehl and Guilfoyle on the trial.

Last Tuesday night, O’Reilly blasted actor Jamie Foxx’s Trayvon Martin T-shirt in a segment with Alan Colmes and Monica Crowley. That was all about race. That same night, he did an editorial monologue on race and the Zimmerman case. It started with this proclamation: “Thanks for watching us tonight. The Trayvon Martin murder case and why it is important. That is the subject of this evening’s ‘Talking Points Memo.’ ” After he finished his point, O’Reilly chewed over the trial in a lengthy discussion with fellow Fox News host Megyn Kelly.

Last Monday night, O’Reilly broke down the trial with Alex Ferrer. Then he brought on Bernard Goldberg to consider media coverage of the trial.

The week before that, O’Reilly was on vacation and thus unable to give the Zimmerman case the constant attention he clearly thinks it deserves.

Erik Wemple writes the Erik Wemple blog, where he reports and opines on media organizations of all sorts.