A policeman takes a nap beside a board written with messages for passengers onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 during a closed meeting held between Malaysian representatives and Chinese relatives of passengers on Flight MH370 at Lido Hotel in Beijing May 2, 2014. Malaysia Airlines on Friday had put up notices to shut down service centres and stop providing accommodation for family members of passengers aboard the missing Flight MH370 in China. On Thursday, Malaysia released its most comprehensive account yet of what happened to missing Flight MH370, detailing the route the plane probably took as it veered off course and the confusion that followed. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER)
Messages for passengers onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. (Jason Lee/Reuters)

The results of CNN’s new poll on missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 are nothing sensational. Seventy-nine percent of respondents believe that there are no survivors in the saga of MH370. No surprise there, considering that the mystery dates to March 8. And 57 percent believe that terrorists were “likely involved” in the tragedy.

Whatever.

The more newsworthy story line from the poll is that CNN cares nothing about the naysayers. From Fox News media guy Howard Kurtz to Fox News eminence Bill O’Reilly to HSBC’s Joe Scarborough to Joe Klein to Joel McHale to hundreds/thousands/hundreds of thousands of Twitter users: Everyone (or just about everyone) either mocked or trashed the 24-7 cable network’s obsession with the flight.

To all of these media elites, CNN says kiss off. The poll, according to a fact sheet, was conducted for CNN by ORC International from May 2-4 — in other words, after the critical consensus on its considerable coverage of MH370 had hardened. Yet CNN shows the gumption to go ahead and pose this question:


Perhaps that question should have carried the following disclaimer: The sponsor of this poll may have influenced your response to this question.

Erik Wemple writes the Erik Wemple blog, where he reports and opines on media organizations of all sorts.