Fox News today announced that it had hired Stacey Dash, renowned for her role in the 1995 movie “Clueless,” as a contributor to shows across the network. According to a release, Dash will “offer cultural analysis and commentary across various daytime and primetime programs.”

The actress has already turned in several appearances on the network, with her highly publicized experience in the 2012 campaign often a centerpiece of the discussion. Prior to the clash between President Obama and challenger Mitt Romney, Dash tweeted out a simple note endorsing the latter as “only choice for your future.”  She took a beating for the endorsement. “I woke up the next morning and my life changed. I had death threats, people calling me Uncle Tom, telling me I didn’t like black people,” said Dash, who is black, in an appearance last month on “Fox & Friends.”

Co-host Steve Doocy commented, “Out of nowhere, suddenly, you are revealed to be a conservative, somebody who supports Republicans — and people were agog.” 

What’s compelling about Dash is that she appears to speak with utter candor about her own experiences. When “Fox & Friends” co-host Brian Kilmeade, for instance, asked Dash whether her support for Romney had affected her career, Dash replied, “It hasn’t affected my career. I think that’s wrong as well. Hollywood is about capitalism. And if you make movies and the movies make money, they’re going to make the movies.”

Then she said, “If Obamacare were a movie, they would not make a sequel.”  Sign up this woman!

Just last week, Dash was a guest on the highly watchable noontime show “Outnumbered,” and her fans applauded. As for her political bent, Dash has said on Fox’s air that the federal government “should not be a part of everything…I think that you should govern where you’re closest to home so that you can tailor your governing to the people’s needs. But for a big federal government to just throw a big blanket over an entire country and say ‘OK, we’re all a bunch of babies and now we’re all nice and warm and cozy’ is a bit ridiculous.”

Erik Wemple writes the Erik Wemple blog, where he reports and opines on media organizations of all sorts.