As pointed out previously in this space, Sharyl Attkisson resigned from CBS News in March, only to embark on a media tour in which she lobbed unsubstantiated allegations at her ex-bosses. In an extended chat with Brian Lamb on CSPAN, Attkisson did a bit more of the same.

Asked by Lamb to provide an “example of when you just got mad and said I’m tired of this,” Attkisson responded in part: “I would just say in general that I’ve never been better positioned to break what I think are great original stories — again, not just on politics but on a broad spectrum of subjects including corporate misdeeds and allegations that are important to consumers and taxpayers and yet never been so terribly positioned to not get it on any broadcast, nobody wants it.”

Attkisson did fill in some details on her departure, telling Lamb that toward the end of her time at CBS News, the network was “not willing . . . to invest in filing suits because many times I didn’t recommend a lawsuit because of the time reasons but at the end I thought for Benghazi and HealthCare.gov, those were two stories that we really might be able to benefit down the road from a lawsuit and they just weren’t willing to invest the time and money.”

The Erik Wemple Blog has asked CBS News about this claim but didn’t immediately receive a response.

When Lamb presented this blog’s reporting about her declining profile on the “CBS Evening News” in recent years, Attkisson said this: “I know why. . . . The bosses that liked the watchdog stories on the government and the investigative reporting left. The managers that came in — Scott Pelley, Pat Shevlin [executive producer] who’s gone now . . .  – but they did not specifically, in my opinion, want these stories. So that was the biggest change. At the same time, this happened at the transition from the Bush administration to the Obama administration. So a lot of things happened and the beats that I had done for many years that were very popular among viewers and popular among the broadcast show executives at the time, all of that changed.”

Erik Wemple writes the Erik Wemple blog, where he reports and opines on media organizations of all sorts.