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Faster Forward
Posted at 02:38 PM ET, 06/24/2011

AntiSec results start rolling in, LulzSec chats exposed

Hackers have hit several high-profile companies

GALLERY: When hackers attack
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On Monday, LulzSec and Anonymous announced that they were joining forces for a new surge of cyberattacks aimed at government agencies and prominent businesses. In just a week, the group has announced two high-profile, politically motivated attacks.

On Friday, Anonymous said via its Twitter feed that a hacking group involved in the movement had posted the names of about 2,800 officers from a special police force in South America. The group said the names were from the Aguilas Negras (Black Eagles) division of the Peruvian National Police Force.

And on Thursday, LulzSec claimed credit for an attack on the Arizona Department of Public Safety, posting internal documents, manuals, e-mail correspondence, names, phone numbers, addresses and passwords taken from the department. The group said it opposes Arizona’s immigration enforcement law, SB 1070.

The Wall Street Journal reported that the Arizona police confirm that the documents appear to be authentic and worry that their officers’ lives may be in danger because of the documents.

Several smaller groups claiming to have joined the movement are popping up on Twitter and appear to be based around the world, including in California, Columbia, Brazil and Australia.

In a report from the Guardian, reporters Ryan Gallagher and Charles Arthur analyzed leaked chat logs from the group’s Internet relay channel (IRC), finding that LulzSec is mostly run by a small group of core hackers: “Sabu,” who sets the group’s targets and coordinates efforts, “Kayla,” who uses the group’s botnet for denial of service attacks, and “Topiary,” charged with managing the group’s public image. All have links with Anonymous, but appear to be operating LulzSec independent of the larger group.

The paper also published the full logs taken from the IRC used by the group. The logs are believed to have been published originally by a former LulzSec associate “m_nerva.” In retaliation for posting the logs, LulzSec claims to have leaked m_nerva’s real name and address.

Related stories:

LulzSec, Anonymous team up against the world

Report: Suspected LulzSec hacker arrested in Britain

PHOTOS: When hackers attack

By  |  02:38 PM ET, 06/24/2011

Tags:  Security

 
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