Nokia N9’s MeeGo is the platform that could have been


Nokia announced its N9 smartphone in Singapore Tuesday.

Before we get to that, however, let’s talk about the hardware of this phone. The unibody phone has a 4.3-inch curved glass AMOLED screen with no forward facing buttons; users double-tap to lock and unlock. The phone also sports an NFC chip, a 1GHz TI OMAP processor, and an 8 MP camera with a 28mm lens by Carl Zeiss. The phone comes in 16GB or 64GB models and you can have it — gasp! — in one of three colors: black, cyan or magenta.

That’s quite the impressive phone to be running a system that’s about to hit a dead-end. Linux-based MeeGo has had a bumpy history, and it’s future is all but over as Nokia CEO Steven Elop promised to have the first Windows Phone devices on the market by 2012.

The company is pushing the user-friendliness of its new phone — and MeeGo — with its slogan that you can operate the phone “with a swipe.” The platform does have some pretty neat features, such as a three-view homescreen, and the ability to pinch to see four or nine open apps at a time.

Check out this video from Nokia for more details:

The phone has gathered good impressions from many members of the tech press, who were happy to hear that, as This is my next reported, elements of the N9 “will live on in a variety of ways.”

The company also announced it will be releasing 10 new Symbian smartphones by the end of the year, restating its commitment to the platform that it will sink in favor of Windows Phone 7.

Speaking of that system, This is my next on Tuesday also showed off a preview of Mango, Microsoft’s next mobile platform, and highlighted the messaging, multitasking, maps feature and photo management as promising components of the system.

Do you think MeeGo was a missed opportunity? Or is Windows Phone the way to go?

Related stories:

Nokia unveils phones in Asia to stem Google, Apple advance

Microsoft shows off new ‘Mango’ Windows Phone update

Nokia to adopt Microsoft's Windows Phone 7, scuttling Symbian

Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.
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