The Washington Post

All federal workers to be quizzed on satisfaction

Don Kelley, center, and other federal employees rallied in April outside Social Security Administration offices in Falls Church. (Mark Gail/The Washington Post)

In what Obama administration officials are calling a first, all permanent, full- and part-time federal employees will have the opportunity to participate this year in the annual Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey, the federal government’s only way of assessing worker satisfaction on a wide scale.

The data, compiled every spring, are then analyzed and tabulated by the Partnership for Public Service, which publishes the widely read “Best Places to Work in the Federal Government” report. (The Partnership maintains a content deal with The Washington Post.)

John Berry, director of the Office of Personnel Management, told agency officials late last week that an increased interest in the survey results compelled his agency to open it up to more than 1.8 million federal employees to weigh in. The move will more than triple the number of eligible respondents.

“While a Governmentwide census will not be conducted every year, having large numbers of respondents will allow agencies the opportunity to analyze results and develop action plans at lower levels in the organization this year,” Berry said in a memo distributed last Friday.

The next survey is scheduled to begin in April, and feds should have a few weeks to complete it. If history is any guide, full results should be published by late summer.

Follow Ed O’Keefe on Twitter: @edatpost

Further reading:

Philippines may allow greater U.S. presence in latest reaction to China’s rise

U.S. forces rescue kidnapped aid workers

For more, visit PostPolitics and The Fed Page.

Ed O’Keefe is covering the 2016 presidential campaign, with a focus on Jeb Bush and other Republican candidates. He's covered presidential and congressional politics since 2008. Off the trail, he's covered Capitol Hill, federal agencies and the federal workforce, and spent a brief time covering the war in Iraq.


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