The Washington Post

Agencies identify hundreds of unnecessary reports


Federal agencies have identified 376 congressionally mandated reports that are outdated, duplicative or serving little use.

The Government Performance and Results Modernization Act, which President Obama signed in 2010, requires the agencies to single out such reports in an effort to reduce unnecessary analyses. 

The Office of Management and Budget posted the list on its Web site. (Click on “linked list” to download the speadsheet).

Among the reports is the Defense Department’s biannual “space protection strategy” analysis, which the agency said it could mesh with a separate review of its overall space posture or its National Security Space Strategy

Also included is a homeland security funding report that requires input from hundreds of people across government and which the White House doesn’t even use in preparing its annual budgets.  

OPM will update the list annually and lawmakers are supposed to work with agencies to revise reporting requirements based on the findings. 

For more federal news from The Washington Post, visit The Federal Eye, The Fed Page,and PostPolitics.

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Josh Hicks covers Maryland politics and government. He previously anchored the Post’s Federal Eye blog, focusing on federal accountability and workforce issues.



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Gene Fynes · January 10, 2013

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