Davita Vance-Cooks confirmed as first female and African American public printer

Davita Vance-Cooks cracked two ceilings at the Government Printing Office on Friday as the Senate unanimously confirmed her as the nation’s public printer, making her both the first female and the first African American to lead the agency.

Vance-Cooks, who has worked in the public sector for more than 30 years, has served as acting public printer since December 2011. During her tenure in that role, she led an effort to rebrand the GPO and keep it relevant in the digital era.

medium-300x180 (Courtesy of GPO) – Davita Vance-Cooks, head of the Government Printing Office.

“I look forward to working with everyone who shares a stake in our historic mission of keeping America informed as we continue transitioning our products and services to meet the needs of Congress, federal agencies and the public in this digital age,” Vance-Cooks said in a statement Friday.

The confirmation of Vance-Cooks marks the swiftest Senate action on a public-printer nominee in nearly 20 years, according to the printing office. President Obama tapped her to head the agency May 9.

To connect with Josh Hicks, follow his Twitter feed, friend his Facebook page or e-mail josh.hicks@washpost.comFor more federal news, visit The Federal Eye, The Fed Page and Post Politics. E-mail federalworker@washpost.com with news tips and other suggestions.

Josh Hicks covers Maryland politics and government. He previously anchored the Post’s Federal Eye blog, focusing on federal accountability and workforce issues.

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