Bill would pay workers for shutdown time

October 1, 2013

House lawmakers on Tuesday proposed a bill that would pay all federal employees retroactively for the duration of the shutdown.

(J. Scott Applewhite/AP)
(J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

The legislation, sponsored by a bipartisan group of lawmakers from fed-heavy Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C., would apply to workers who are furloughed and those who are not.

The lead sponsors are Reps. Jim Moran (D-Va.) and Frank Wolf (R-Va.).

“Nearly a million federal workers could lose their pay because Congress failed to do its job and keep the government up and running,” Moran said in a joint statement with the other lawmakers. “Leaving the question of retroactive pay for furloughed employees, already shouldering much of the burden of sequestration, up to this highly divisive Congress is deeply concerning.”

Wolf added: “Employees at the FBI, DEA and U.S. Marshals Service shouldn’t be punished because the Congress couldn’t get its job done. They should be properly compensated for the hard work they do to make our nation a safer and better place.”

Other sponsors to the bill include Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.) and Reps. Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), Rob Wittman (R-Va.), John Sarbanes (D-Md.), Donna Edwards (D-Md.), Gerry Connolly (D-Va.), Scott Rigell (R-Va.) and John Delaney (D-Md.).

For the record, that’s nine Democrats and three Republicans.

On Monday, President Obama signed a bill guaranteeing that members of the military and some of the civilian workers who support them would be paid during the shutdown.

To connect with Josh Hicks, follow his Twitter feed or e-mail  josh.hicks@washpost.comFor more federal news, visit The Federal Eye, The Fed Page and Post Politics. E-mail federalworker@washpost.com with news tips and other suggestions.

Josh Hicks covers the federal government and anchors the Federal Eye blog. He reported for newspapers in the Detroit and Seattle suburbs before joining the Post as a contributor to Glenn Kessler’s Fact Checker blog in 2011.
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Josh Hicks · October 1, 2013