Nominations begin for ‘Sammies’ public-service awards

December 10, 2013

The nomination process has begun for the annual Samuel J. Heyman Service to America medals, considered among the most prestigious awards within the federal workforce.

The Partnership for Public Service announced this week that it will accept nominations for the so-called “Sammie” awards on a special Web site through Jan. 17.

Tara Palmore, left, and Julie Segre, right, received the 2013 Federal Employee of the Year award. (Sam Kittner/kittner.com).
Tara Palmore, left, and Julie Segre, right, received the 2013 Federal Employee of the Year award. (Sam Kittner/kittner.com)

The contest involves medals in categories ranging from Career Achievement to Homeland Security and Law Enforcement, with a selection committee choosing the winners based on three criteria: the impact of their work on meeting the needs of the nation; on-the-job innovation; and commitment to public service.

The highest award, for Federal Employee of the Year, went to an epidemiologist and a genome researcher at the National Institutes of Health who helped stop an outbreak of a deadly bacterium.

MORE: Two at NIH who fought a fatal ‘superbug’ are Federal Employees of the Year

AND MORE: Slideshow of the 2013 award winners

The 2014 award finalists will be recognized next spring at a Capitol Hill ceremony during Public Service Recognition Week, while the winners will be honored at a separate event in Washington next fall.

The awards are named after a business leader and philanthropist who founded the Partnership for Public Service, a good-government advocacy group.

Follow Josh Hicks on TwitterFacebook or Google+. Connect by e-mail at  josh.hicks@washpost.comVisit The Federal Eye, The Fed Page and Post Politics for more federal news. E-mail federalworker@washpost.com with news tips and other suggestion.

Josh Hicks covers the federal government and anchors the Federal Eye blog. He reported for newspapers in the Detroit and Seattle suburbs before joining the Post as a contributor to Glenn Kessler’s Fact Checker blog in 2011.
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Josh Hicks · December 10, 2013