Federal worker provisions in Obama’s budget

President Obama’s budget blueprint for fiscal year 2015 has provisions that would directly affect federal employees. The White House previously announced it would propose a 1 percent pay raise for federal workers.

President Obama speaks to the members of the National Governors Association in the State Dining Room at the White House on Feb. 24, 2014. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)
President Obama speaks to the members of the National Governors Association in the State Dining Room at the White House on Feb. 24, 2014. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

Here is language directly from the  budget documents he released Monday.

The budget will:

“… help us put a stop to short-sighted cuts to Government operations that compromise efficiency and effectiveness and cost money over the long run, such as growing deferred maintenance backlogs, sharp cuts to Federal employee training, and erosions in customer service at agencies like the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).”

“Investing in Federal Employee Training—restoring cuts to Federal employee training to help train, retain, and recruit a skilled and effective Federal workforce, targeting investments in employee training to common, but high-impact areas such as customer service or information technology.”

“The health insurance marketplace has changed significantly
since the FEHBP (Federal Employees Health Benefits Program) was enacted in 1959 and the current governing statute leaves little flexibility for the program to evolve with the changing market. The 2015 budget proposes that beginning in 2016: domestic partners of Federal employees and new retirees
would be eligible for health benefits…”

“Modernizes Federal Workers’ Compensation. The Budget acts on longstanding recommendations from the Government Accountability Office, the Congressional Budget Office, and DOL’s (Department of Labor) Inspector General—as well as numerous Securing Americans Value and Efficiency (SAVE) Award nominations—to reform the Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (FECA), which has not been substantially updated since 1974. The Budget proposes a series of FECA reforms that will generate Government-wide savings of more than $340 million over 10 years.”

federaldiary@washpost.com

Twitter: @JoeDavidsonWP

Joe Davidson writes the Federal Diary, a column about the federal workplace that celebrated its 80th birthday in November 2012.
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