TSA’s expedited screening lanes soon open to DOD and Coast Guard civilians

Civilian employees of the Defense Department and Coast Guard can access faster screening lanes at major U.S. airports with their DOD identification numbers starting April 15, according to transportation security officials.

The change represents the latest expansion of the Transportation Security Administration’s Pre-Check program, which allows certain travelers to cross through checkpoints without removing laptops, shoes, belts or light outerwear.

TSA opened Pre-Check to the general public in July, but U.S. civilian participants who don’t work for the Defense Department or Coast Guard must be members of a Customs and Border Protection trusted-traveler program or meet TSA criteria and belong to a frequent-flier club.


(George Frey/Reuters)

TSA already began allowing members of the armed forces to use their DOD identification numbers when booking flights to access the expedited screening lanes in December. That same program will apply to Defense Department and Coast Guard civilians beginning in mid-April.

“TSA continuously looks for more opportunities to provide the most effective security in the most efficient way possible,” said TSA Press Secretary Ross Feinstein.

TSA officers will still perform bag and body scans on Pre-Check passengers. The agents will also use “random and unpredictable security measures” on those travelers, according to Feinstein.

Participating airports in the D.C. region include Baltimore-Washington International (BWI), Ronald Reagan Washington National (DCA), and Washington Dulles International (IAD).

Follow Josh Hicks on TwitterFacebook or Google+. Connect by e-mail at  josh.hicks@washpost.comVisit The Federal Eye, The Fed Page and Post Politics for more federal news. E-mail federalworker@washpost.com with news tips and other suggestions.

Josh Hicks covers the federal government and anchors the Federal Eye blog. He reported for newspapers in the Detroit and Seattle suburbs before joining the Post as a contributor to Glenn Kessler’s Fact Checker blog in 2011.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Politics
Next Story
Joe Davidson · March 27