The Washington Post

John Beck: No friction between him and Grossman

John Beck and Rex Grossman attracted attention last month with their much-discussed radio interview campaigns for the Washington Redskins’ starting quarterback job. This week, for the third time of the offseason, they alternated leading the offense in informal group workouts organized by players.

At times this week, Grossman, who started the final three games of the 2010 season but is a free agent, looked sharper than Beck. Other times, Beck looked a little better. Grossman tended to get the ball out more quickly than Beck did, but both had their share of interceptions.

Beck remains the more outwardly vocal and proactive of the two. Throughout the offseason, he has invited receivers to get together for throwing sessions here and in San Diego. He had the practices taped and helped organize a viewing session at tight end Chris Cooley’s house Wednesday evening, and he stuck around after each practice session to do interviews.

On the field, Grossman definitely did his share of tutoring this week. He’d often line up under center, then stop and walk out to a rookie receiver and show him where to line up and where his route was supposed to take him. Grossman has more experience in this offense. He was in the same system in Houston in 2009 and then started late last season.
But Grossman always left immediately after practice, preferring to fly under the radar rather than field a bunch of questions from pesky reporters.

Despite the fact that the pair is competing for the same job, Beck said there’s no friction between him and Grossman.

“We’re both professionals,” he said. “We’ve been in this situation before. I get that question asked all the time. But is this the first time that either one of us has competed for a job with an NFL team? No. We know what the feeling’s like. We know the way the team views it. We know how we have to both be as the quarterback of the team. It’s part of the job and both of us know that, and we’re used to it and that’s just what it is.”

The two have very different styles, but teammates say both are effective.

Tight end Chris Cooley, whose locker at Redskins Park is next to Grossman’s, said: “I think both of our quarterbacks have done a great job of giving us a script and telling us what plays we’re going to run and leading the offense.”

Mike Jones covers the Washington Redskins for The Washington Post. When not writing about a Redskins development of some kind – which is rare – he can be found screaming and cheering at one of his kids’ softball, baseball, soccer or basketball games.



Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Show Comments
Most Read



Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Your Three. Videos curated for you.
Play Videos
Don’t be ‘that’ sports parent | On Parenting
Miss Manners: The technology's changed, but the rules are the same
A flood of refugees from Syria but only a trickle to America
Play Videos
John Lewis, 'Marv the Barb' and the politics of barber shops
Kids share best advice from mom
Using Fitbit to help kids lose weight
Play Videos
This man's job is binge-watching for Netflix
Transgender swimmer now on Harvard men's team
Portland's most important meal of the day
Play Videos
5 ways to raise girls to be leaders
How much can one woman eat?
The signature drink of New Orleans