The Washington Post

Reed Doughty tries to recover from a rough outing

As the Redskins study film Monday, it’s the bad plays they focus on, looking for ways to improve technique, execution and strategy. Safety Reed Doughty probably has a couple of plays he’ll want to review a few times.

“Obviously, there’s room for improvement,” Doughty said Monday.

Doughty started in place of LaRon Landry. Playing special teams and every defensive snap, he was on the field quite a bit in Sunday’s win over the Giants. He led the team with 10 tackles, but that stat can be misleading when it comes to defensive backs. If a safety is credited with a tackle, that means a receiver is likely catching the ball.

Reed Dought (No. 37) and DeJon Gomes (John McDonnell/Washington Post)

The Redskins were playing two-deep and when Nicks reached Doughty, the veteran safety bit hard on a double-move. Nicks quickly had a 5-yard cushion and Doughty was nowhere near the receiver when the ball arrived.

“I have the dig, I have the up -- got to play it all,” Doughty said. “They ran the dig and up. Just got to see them through the break. One more step and it’s the dig. He made two steps, he comes up -- I got to go with him.”

On New York’s second score, the Giants were lined up at the Redskins’ 6-yard line. Doughty saw the formation and guessed Manning would be throwing a quick screen to Nicks. He guessed wrong. Instead, Manning handed off to Ahmad Bradshaw, who caught Doughty leaning to the outside and had no trouble getting into the end zone.

“I jumped out for that smoke route and it was a run. You got to come inside-out in that situation,” Doughty said. “You’d rather the ball bounce than cut up inside. There’s no excuse. You got to make the play.”

We won‘t know about Landry‘s status for Sunday’s game against Arizona until later this week, but it‘s likely Doughty will see plenty of action for a second week in a row. As a spot starter, Doughty isn’t worried that teams might be targeting him.

“I don’t think they’re going to pick on me in any way,” he said. “They’re going to run their routes. If O.J. [Atogwe] was on the field, they would’ve run the same routes. Whether they would’ve gotten it or not, I can’t tell you that. I’ve played this game a long time. I made eight starts last year. I’ve had double moves before and they haven’t gotten me on it. So it’s just a matter of focus, matter of paying attention to detail the whole play.”

Rick Maese is a sports features writer for The Washington Post.



Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Show Comments
Most Read



Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Your Three. Videos curated for you.
Play Videos
What can babies teach students?
Unconventional warfare with a side of ale
A veteran finds healing on a dog sled
Play Videos
A fighter pilot helmet with 360 degrees of sky
Is fencing the answer to brain health?
Scenes from Brazil's Carajás Railway
Play Videos
How a hacker group came to Washington
The woman behind the Nats’ presidents ‘Star Wars’ makeover
How hackers can control your car from miles away
Play Videos
Philadelphia's real signature sandwich
Full disclosure: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 ghoul
Europe's migrant crisis, explained