Redskins keep Adam Carriker on PUP list, so he can practice [updated]

November 19, 2013
carriker

UPDATE, 4:24 a.m.

Correction: Adam Carriker’s season has not ended as I previously reported late Tuesday night.

By electing to keep Carriker on the Reserve/Physically Unable to Perform list rather than deactivating him, the team allows him to attempt to practice, and Washington now has a 21-day window to evaluate his progress. The team then will determine whether to activate him, or if they should place him on season-ending IR, or release him.

I apologize for the error. Carriker’s status on the daily NFL transaction report was listed as:

“WASHINGTON

Carriker, Adam

Remains on Reserve/Physically Unable to Perform”

But I missed the header further up on the page that listed the players of  seven other teams, and Carriker as well, in the “Returned to practice” category.

It’s not clear what capacity of “practice” activity Carriker took part in on Tuesday, because the Redskins didn’t practice.

Original post, 10:15 p.m., Tuesday

The Washington Redskins officially opted on Tuesday to keep defensive end Adam Carriker on the Reserve/Physically Unable to Perform list, according to the NFL’s daily transaction report.

The move ends Carriker’s comeback quest for the 2013 season.

Carriker missed the bulk of the 2012 season after suffering a torn quadricep tendon on the second play of Washington’s Week 2 matchup with St. Louis. Carriker had surgery shortly after but needed another procedure in the spring, and a third in late July because he still didn’t have adequate range of motion.

He held out hope of returning sometime this season. But last week, Redskins coach Mike Shanahan said Carriker still hadn’t fully recovered.

Carriker restructured his deal with Washington during the offseason but remains under contract through the 2015 season.

Mike Jones covers the Washington Redskins for The Washington Post. When not writing about a Redskins development of some kind – which is rare – he can be found screaming and cheering at one of his kids’ softball, baseball, soccer or basketball games.
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