DeSean Jackson continues to nurse hamstring


DeSean Jackson catches a pass in front of wide receivers coach Ike Hilliard. (John McDonnell/The Washington Post)

Redskins wide receiver DeSean Jackson remained sidelined with a strained hamstring during the Redskins’ second week of offseason practices, but said he possibly could return to action next week.

Jackson, who injured his hamstring on a deep route in last Thursday’s practice, ran a couple of half-speed routes during positional drills, but wore only a sun visor with his jersey, and watched the remainder of practice.

DeSean Jackson, Robert Griffin III DeSean Jackson, left, with Robert Griffin III during a practice last week. (Richard Lipski/Associated Press)

Asked when he expected to return to action, Jackson said, “I don’t know. Maybe next week. We’ll see how it feels. It’s going pretty good, so we’ll see how it feels next week.”

Said coach Jay Gruden, “DeSean has a minor tweak, i guess. All hamstrings are different, but he’s rehabbing with [athletic trainer] Larry [Hess] and hopefully he’ll be ready to go next week for the final week of the OTAs.”

With Jackson sidelined, fellow wide receiver Andre Roberts joined Pierre Garcon in the starting lineup. Santana Moss replaced Roberts as the primary slot receiver during first-team drills on Wednesday.

Have a Redskins question? Send an e-mail to mike.jones@washpost.com with the subject line “Mailbag question,” and it might be answered on Tuesday in The Mailbag.

More from The Post:

D.C. Sports Bog: RGIII’s got another mantra/T-shirt

Bog: DeSean talks about welcome to D.C., plans for Eagles

Hatcher says Redskins have to expect to be a great defense

Mailbag: Tight end depth, pass rush and cornerback battles

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Mike Jones covers the Washington Redskins for The Washington Post. When not writing about a Redskins development of some kind – which is rare – he can be found screaming and cheering at one of his kids’ softball, baseball, soccer or basketball games.
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