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Posted at 01:55 PM ET, 04/12/2011

D.C. is Avenue ‘Cue

It wouldn’t just be hackneyed to say the Washington-area barbecue scene is on fire, it’d be downright false, too. That’s because the scene is actually ablaze.
Hungry for barbecue? Check out the beef brisket from Westend Bistro. (James M. Thresher - For The Washington Post)

In recent weeks, the All We Can Eat blog has written about no fewer than three barbecue restaurant openings: the Texas-themed Hill Country Barbecue Market in Penn Quarter, the smallish beer garden Standard on 14th Street NW and the humble Upper Marlboro joint Chuck’s Wagon.

You know what has been happening in the meantime? All hell has been breaking loose, that’s what.

Food trucks. Fancy restaurants. Even Nationals Ballpark. You name it, there is probably barbecue going on there.

This week, there’s a rundown of where you can find some of the new additions to the city’s barbecue landscape. I’ll write about some of these more in-depth in the coming weeks. But I wanted to make sure you pushed the pins of these newcomers into your barbecue map.

Carnivore BBQ Having trolled the Maryland farmers markets for three years, this flame-painted food truck is practically an old-timer. But its entry into the D.C. food-truck cavalcade is new, having just hit the streets last month.

From his 1988 Chevy C20 pickup, owner Stephen Adelson serves up two sandwiches — beef brisket and pulled pork. Both are slow-roasted over red oak and white oak for 22 hours in a hand-built smoker and served on Uptown Bakery buns. The three homemade sauces include a mild tomato-based one, a vinegar-and-peppers sauce and a mild-burn, mustard-based scotch bonnet sauce. The optional, sandwich-topping slaw is vinegar-based.

BBQ Bus DC Run by two partners, this truck just entered the D.C . food-truck fray on Friday, primarily working the H Street NE party scene and, on Saturday, Chinatown. The guys dish up a “Hawaiian BBQ Pork” that’s seasoned with Hawaiian sea salt and spices, wrapped in ti leaves (long, wide green leaves used in traditional Hawaiian barbecuing), wood-smoked and served with a teriyaki-barbecue sauce. The other three offerings are more traditional, and all are pulled: pork, chicken and beef.

Read more over at All We Can Eat .

By  |  01:55 PM ET, 04/12/2011

Categories:  Restaurants

 
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