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Posted at 04:12 PM ET, 04/26/2011

Nightlife Agenda: Wilson Center anniversary and Rockstar DJs


Swedish indie trio Peter, Bjorn and John performs at the 9:30 Club on Saturday night, then heads over to the W Hotel’s rooftop deck to DJ a late-night dance party. (Photo by Johan Bergmark)
This week finds at least three different musicians hosting and DJing at “offical” post-concert parties, including Of Montreal, Peter Bjorn and John and some of the artists involved in the Sweetlife Festival. Other highlights include a tribute to the famed Wilson Center concert venue, with a talk by punk icon Ian MacKaye (who played there with Minor Threat and Fugazi), the return of Hip-Hop Trivia Night, an intimate performance by Jagged Edge and a rooftop party across the street from the Capitol with performances by DJ Stereofaith and Sharkey. Oh, and the Black Squirrel has Fat Tire beer again — and this time, it’s for the whole summer!

Wednesday, April 27

In Friday’s Weekend section you’ll learn all about the throwback rock-and-roll mayhem of Baltimore’s J-Roddy Walston & the Business. The band is in the midst of a residency at the Rock & Roll Hotel where they take the stage four consecutive Wednesdays, and they’ll certainly win over many new fans with their all-out performances. This week’s edition is an especially good one to catch because the opener is local favorite Deleted Scenes, another band with tons of energy. Hear a preview of material from the excellent upcoming album, “Young People’s Church of the Air.”

Starting this week, the Black Squirrel is kicking off a summer of New Belgium beers in Adams Morgan. For the excitable types, that mean you can drink the famous (and famously over-rated) Fat Tire Ale ALL SUMMER LONG! For the rest of us, it’s a chance to delve into the Colorado brewer’s harder-to-find products, such as hoppy seasonal Arrow Pale Ale, 1554 Black Ale and Abbey, the rightfully famous and richly malted brew that‘s won 16 medals at various beer competitions across the country. There will also be 22-ounce bottles from the limited Lips of Faith series; the fruity Le Fleur, Misseur? was a revelation last time the Black Squirrel brought it to D.C. Enjoy the beers, but please, please try something beyond Fat Tire.

With an acrobatic flow and one of the most distinctive deliveries among out-of-the-mainstream rappers, Homeboy Sandman has won hip-hop cognoscenti’s attention over three short years. He’s supporting the DC9 stop on the CunninLynguists’ Oneirology tour, named for the trio’s first full-length release in three years. When forming in 2000, CunninLynguists was one of the few Southern hip-hop groups with distinctly Southern rhyme styles over a variety of tracks.

Thursday, April 28

A few years ago, it seemed like every third band hosted an “official after-party,” during which a few members would get in a DJ booth and spin their favorite tunes for a packed bar. The trend died down, but it looks like it’s roaring back this week with three separate events that finds musicians playing selecter. On Thursday, Of Montreal frontman Kevin Barnes is heading to Bourbon after his band’s concert at the 9:30 Club, where he’ll spin as DJ Perverted Dowry at the band’s official afterparty, alongside local DJ Lightwaves. Drinks are two-for-one between 9 and 10 p.m.; RSVP to allthingsgomusic@gmail.com to guarantee admission.

Out of all the post-Jodeci, pre-neo-soul R&B singers, whom would you count on to still bring it in 2011? Joe and Case have been known to still have some hot performances to spare, but in the underdog corner, you can’t dismiss Jagged Edge’s effect on the ladies. Consider past hits like “Let’s Get Married” and “He Can’t Love You.” It’s the only group able to push forward the tradition of synced choreography in Jodeci-style baggy leather pants. The quartet plays the Plugged In concert series at The Park, and the show starts at 8 p.m.

Hip-Hop Trivia was an anchor event for Lounge of Three’s evolution into a hip-hop head’s version of Cheers before it left LOIII last year and, eventually, went on hiatus. We’re happy to report the event’s return to Queen Makeda, the homey Ethiopian restaurant where the trivia night was most recently held. The event’s curators assemble a slate of questions ranging from bedrock knowledge to supreme rap-nerd minutiae; you may even hear DJs spinning hip-hop tunes and asking participants to identify which songs are being sampled. Two teams of four members each battle it out during each of the evening’s two matches. Get there at 7 p.m. for the sign-up.

If you prefer your electro-house on the rough, techy end of things, then you probably know that Dutch DJ Sander Kleinenberg is paying a visit to Lima this week. If you don’t, well -- this is a guy whose cutting-edge VJing and DJing has led to headlining slots and residencies from Ibiza to New York, alongside a series of “This is …” mix albums. Catching Sander K in a club the size of Lima is a must-do, especially when you can see him for free, thanks to this pass on the Glow Web site. All you need to do is arrive by 11. (And you should, because the up-and-coming Pleasurekraft, is opening.)

Digital cumbia is an Argentinian-born sound with a global mind-set. Colombian rhythms, strains of Latin American folk, a bit of dub, some pulsing electronic beats - it’s a heady mix that’s made for your body. Chancha via Circuito is the Argentinian producer who is doing the most interesting things with this sound, and along with fellow DJ El G, he’s sure to turn Judy’s into a Southern Hemisphere dance party.

You better believe that Arc in Round songs sound fantastic. That’s because the band’s frontman is Jeff Zeigler, Philadelphia’s go-to producer for all things psychedelic. He manned the boards for standout albums by Kurt Vile and the War on Drugs, and he creates his own widescreen, multilayered soundscapes with Arc in Round. Chicago’s experimental pop band Red and Blue and local psych-shoegazers Last Tide also play at Comet Ping Pong.

It’s time for an edition of Que Sera, the eclectic mix of ‘60s garage rock, surf music, boogie rock and whatever else the Thornley brothers of U.S. Royalty and their friends Aaron Baird and Ryan Mitchell feel like dropping for the dancing crowd in the chic basement of Napoleon. There’s no cover, which means more money for champagne cocktails.

Friday, April 29

You may have been to Hamilton’s for the bar’s $1 PBR Fridays. You may have played beer pong in the basement after a kickball game on the Mall. But you ain’t seen nothing like the bar’s rooftop party atop Charlie Palmer at 101 Constitution Avenue. The views of the Capitol -- located just across the street -- are unforgettable. DJs Stereofaith and Sharkey are on the decks. There’s a cash bar. And there’s no cover. Doors open at 6 and close at midnight, when the party moves a few blocks over to Hamilton’s -- and Stereofaith heads to the wildly popular Becky night at the Rock and Roll Hotel. Arrive early or wait in line. (Note: Though the building’s address is 101 Constitution Ave., the entrance for the party is on Louisiana Avenue.)

For nine years, DJ Lil’ E has been hosting the best alternative ‘80s party in D.C. -- think Cure, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Morrissey and Talking Heads instead of Madonna and Cyndi Lauper, but you might hear some of that popular stuff. Her Right Round night marks its anniversary with a blowout on the Black Cat’s mainstage.

How do you make Marvin’s dance floor even more crowded on a Friday night? Let DJ Deep Sang bring New York discomonger Love on the Run down for a special Disco Invasion dance party full of disco, early house, funk and Latin beats. Check out this mix for a taste of Love on the Run, and get your comfortable shoes out from under the bed. Things get started at 10.

Saturday, April 30

To Call the Wilson Center a D.C. punk institution would be a bit of an understatement. Thirty years ago, the basement of the former Central Presbyterian Church became ground zero for one of the country’s most vital music scenes. It was a fitting home for local punk - a no-frills, DIY space that was open to anyone who had some initiative and wanted to express themselves. The first show was a mind-blowing bill including Minor Threat, Scream and Void. The list of punk greats who performed in the tiny venue is too long to list but includes Bad Brains, Fugazi, Government Issue and the Misfits. It stopped hosting shows a decade ago, but activist group Positive Force D.C. is paying tribute to the Wilson Center’s legacy with a 30th anniversary celebration that is less about remembering past glories and more about keeping traditions thriving. D.C. underground staple Max Levine Ensemble will headline a concert starting at 7 p.m.; Minor Threat and Fugazi vocalist Ian MacKaye will host a Q&A about community spaces at 5 p.m.

Rockstars as DJ #2: The Brightest Young Things series at the W Hotel’s rooftop bar continues with an official after-party for Swedish indie-rock trio Peter, Bjorn and John, who perform at the 9:30 Club. The band will DJ from midnight to close, following an opening set by DJ William Alberque of Razzmatazz. Again, admission is free, but RSVP to whappenings@brandlinkdcrsvp.com to get on the list and beat the long lines. The cocktails and views are worth it.

Cuban Cowboys isn’t exactly truth in band-name advertising. Cuban? Yep. But don’t expect cry-in-your-cerveza country standards from the quintet. There’s more of a surf-rock vibe that runs through the group’s upbeat songs, so save some energy for dancing at Artisphere.

Sunday, May 1

Rockstars as DJs, Part the Third: U Street Music Hall is the site of the after-party for Sunday’s big Sweetlife Festival at Merriweather Post Pavilion. Several performers from the festival will take turns in the DJ booth, though the club is not publicly announcing who they are. Let’s just say that fans of underground music won’t be disappointed.

By , and Rhome Anderson  |  04:12 PM ET, 04/26/2011

Categories:  Bars and Clubs

 
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