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Posted at 06:02 PM ET, 03/01/2012

On stage in March


A celebration of puppeteer Basil Twist kicks off with a fresh take on "Petrushka." (By Richard Termine)

March is all about movement on area stages. Talented tapper Savion Glover and imaginative ballet choreographer Angelin Preljocaj are coming to town; puppeteer Basil Twist is giving “Petrushka” a rousing makeover; and Synetic Theater is putting a fresh spin on its tried-and-tested Silent Shakespeare series.

We’ve all been there: Our carefully orchestrated lives give way to utter chaos, and the only logical solutions seem to be hiding under the covers or moving far, far away to, say, Australia. Well, you’re not alone. The protagonist of the beloved kids-book-turned-play Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Dayfeels your pain. Misery loves company, of course, but it can also be alleviated with laughter, which is just the reason to take in this Adventure Theatre production, which is geared toward kids 4 and older. (March 2-April 9)

Signature Theatre hosts the world premiere of the rock musical Brother Russia.” The play within a play by writing team John Dempsey and Dana Rowe follows a theatre troupe’s production about Rasputin. (March 6-April 15)

March marks the beginning of the Eugene O’Neill Festival. The Pulitzer winner and Nobel laureate will be honored around town with performances, readings, lectures and (what better way?) a Saint Paddy’s Day singalong. The whole thing launches on the 9th at Arena Stage, which is mounting a production of Ah, Wilderness! starring local standouts Rick Foucheux and Nancy Robinette. The sweet coming-of-age tale is a worthwhile diversion from O’Neill’s typically heart-breaking works. (March 9-April 8)

The story of King Arthur has never seemed so absurd — or musical — than in Monty Python’s Spamalot, coming to the Warner Theatre courtesy of the legendary British comedy troupe behind “Flying Circus.” (March 13-18)

The Kennedy Center’s celebration of the culture of Budapest, Prague and Vienna includes a visit from Hungary’s Katona József Theatre in a performance of Gypsies.” The drama, which is presented in Hungarian with English supertitles, chronicles the relationships between rural inhabitants. (March 15-17)

A three-show celebration of renowned New York puppeteer Basil Twist kicks off at the Lansburgh Theatre. The Shakespeare Theatre Company is hosting a distinctive rendition of Petrushka,” the tale about a clown who falls in love with a ballerina only to be thwarted by a conniving character. The action is set to the Stravinsky score that accompanies the ballet version of the story. (March 16-25)

Local choreographer Nejla Y. Yatkin , known for her compelling political works, presents the world premiere of “Oasis: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Middle East but Were Afraid to Dance” at Dance Place. (March 24-25)

Shakespeare Theatre Company will also be getting in on the Eugene O’Neill celebration. Artistic director Michael Kahn brings the playwright’s Strange Interlude to Harman Hall. The controversial Pulitzer-winning drama, first produced in 1928, follows one woman’s horrifyingly bad decisions after the death of her fiance. (March 27-April 29)

Snow White isn’t the only big name populating Blanche Neigeat the Kennedy Center. The fairy tale adaptation by France-based choreographer Angelin Preljocaj also touts music by Gustav Mahler and — fashion lovers take note — costumes by Jean-Paul Gaultier. (March 30-April 1)

1st Stage presents Warren Leight’s Side Man,” an understated account of a family’s slow dissolution. Forum Theatre’s Michael Dove will take on directing duties. (March 30-April 22)

Savion Glover, the Tony-winning tap prodigy behind “Bring in ’Da Noise, Bring in ’Da Funk,” brings his breathtaking dance skills to the Warner Theatre. (March 30-31)

It’s time to see what all the fuss (in the form of Helen Hayes nominations) is about. After scoring 15 nods for “King Lear,” Synetic Theater mounts another in its singular wordless Shakespeare series. This time, though, the troupe is going for something a little different — a comedy — with The Taming of the Shrew.” (March 31-April 22)

By  |  06:02 PM ET, 03/01/2012

Categories:  Theater

 
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