The Lot at Union Kitchen: Music, beer and food trucks at D.C.’s newest pop-up festival

Live music, beer and food trucks add up to a great Saturday evening. The Lot at Union Kitchen, which launched Saturday at Third and L streets NE, has all three in spades.

The Lot is run by the team behind Union Kitchen, which rents commercial kitchen space to food truck operators, caterers and start-up businesses. They turn the Kitchen's asphalt parking lot into a low-key neighborhood version of Truckeroo Saturdays from 5 to 10 p.m.

The Lot at Union Kitchen

Sam McCormally of Paperhaus and Ugly Purple Sweater performs his solo set at the Lot at Union Kitchen. (Photo by Fritz Hahn/The Washington Post)

During Saturday's debut, members of local rock group Paperhaus performed for an audience seated at tables – well, rolling kitchen carts – topped with flowers and citronella candles. The Something Stuffed food truck served up spicy bowls of sweet potato noodles, mushrooms, cilantro and pork or chicken for $5. Other booths offered $5 cups of vegetarian chili or gourmet ice cream sandwiches, while a bar poured $5 wines by the glass and plastic cups of DC Brau served straight from the keg.

Union Kitchen co-founder Jonas Singer says that each week will feature "two different dinner options and a desert item," prepared by different members of Union Kitchen. He says the price point will be similar, with food priced between $5 and $8. "We're trying to keep it affordable," Singer says. This week has a barbecue theme, with South Carolina 'cue from the new Altis BBQ, plus a veggie option so no one's left out.

The concert series, which will run through Nov. 2, features a wide range of D.C.-based acts, including electronica quartet Brett (Saturday), R&B singer Jay Hayden (Sept. 28), and indie-folkies Pree (Sept. 14). Music begin around 6 p.m. and there's never a cover charge. "We want people to be able to just walk in and hear some great local music," Singer says.

The Lot at Union Kitchen

The laid-back vibe at the Lot at Union Kitchen feels like a neighborhood block party instead of a loud, crazy festival. (Photo by Fritz Hahn/The Washington Post)

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