How The Washington Post and the New York Times covered Archduke Ferdinand’s assassination

June 28, 2014

A century ago today, anarchists in Sarajevo assassinated Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne. The assassination set off a chain of events that led to the start of the Great War, which began a month later.

Here’s how The Washington Post covered Ferdinand’s death, on Monday, June 29, 1914:


Here’s the full PDF.

“HEIR TO AUSTRIAN THRONE, ARCHDUKE FERDINAND, AND WIFE SLAIN BY ASSASSIN,” reads the two-column banner headline. “ESCAPE BOMB; DIE BY PISTOL,” says the subhead. Page 2 features a list of the prominent “Rulers and Notables Killed by Assassins” since 1801 (an early listicle?):

Here’s the New York Times front page from the same day, with a four-column lede, courtesy their very cool Times Machine:



On page two, the Times includes a special cable from Rome, under the headline: “Pope Much Depressed.”

Reid Wilson covers national politics and Congress for The Washington Post. He is the author of Read In, The Post’s morning tip sheet on politics.
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