Minnesota governor mandates increase in state’s hiring of disabled employees


Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton (D) signed an executive order this week requiring the state’s largest employer, government agencies under the executive branch, to increase the percentage of employees who are disabled.

The executive order, signed Monday, mandates the percentage of employees who are disabled must increase  to 7 percent by 2018. It is currently around 3 percent, the governor’s office said in a statement, down from about 10 percent in 1999.

Minnesota’s executive branch agencies include about 35,000 employees responsible for overseeing everything from alcohol and gambling enforcement to dog breeding licenses. An additional 20,000 work in the state college system. The executive branch agencies employ more Minnesotans than any other employer, ahead of the federal government, Mayo Clinic, and Target, according to data from the 2013 Business Information Guide.

The executive order also calls for updated hiring tools, a system of reporting quarterly progress to the governor’s office, and internship programs for people with disabilities.

Hunter Schwarz covers state and local politics and policy across the country for the Washington Post.
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