About half of those scheduled to apply for a license under Colorado’s immigration license law actually got one


Immigrant and longtime resident in the United States Rosalva Mireles is photographed by Jesus Sanchez of Spanish-language newspaper El Commercio after Mireles was processed for her permanent driver’s license, and received a temporary license, at a Department of Motor Vehicles office in Denver on Aug. 1. (Brennan Linsley/AP)

In the first week Colorado began offering driver’s licenses and other forms of ID to residents regardless of immigration status, only half of those with appointments ended up receiving receiving licenses.

According to data from the Colorado Department of Revenue, 1,085 people were scheduled to have appointments between Aug. 1 and 11, and 559 received either a driver’s license, permit or ID. The other half either did not make their appointments or did not fulfill the requirements to receive one.

Colorado is the 11th state to offer driver’s licenses to residents regardless of immigration status. To qualify, residents must prove they’ve lived in the state continuously for 24 months and have documents such as a passport from their country of origin.

Hunter Schwarz covers the intersection of politics and pop culture for the Washington Post

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Hunter Schwarz · August 13, 2014