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Posted at 11:27 AM ET, 03/23/2012

Broncos handle Tim Tebow’s departure deftly

Why the big rush by the Broncos to get Tim Tebow off the team?

I’ll tell you why: The longer he remained with Denver, the more pressure owner Pat Bowlen and head football exec John Elway were going to feel from Tebow supporters and the media. And they were trying to quickly put a bow on Tebow’s departure so media attention would shift to the city where he’s headed, New York, rather than stay focused on the Broncos. Which has clearly happened.

I’ll give Elway credit on this. He sent Tebow to the largest media market in the country and, as expected, the media have jumped all over this story.

ESPN showed television evangelist Pat Robertson talking about how wrongly the Broncos had treated Tebow. Robertson, the man who wanted to spread the gospel to the whole world so he ran for president. Really? Pat Robertson knows he doesn’t watch football. But I guess he does watch Tim Tebow.

I’m sure the Broncos will feel the effects of treating Tebow in what some perceive as a callous manner. But they also know that Tebow will speak positively about his situation and keep quiet about any ill feeling toward his former team.

The tension created by this move will subside well before training camp. Peyton Manning will gradually take over the headlines, especially in Denver. But stay tuned for now.

In other football news, there’s the issue of Congress and Bounty Gate. I saw a Senate subcommittee is getting ready for a hearing.

Why? Is this something the U.S. government should spend time and taxpayer money on? No! Worry about unemployment, foreclosures and tax issues. This comes across as a self absorbed senator who wants some face time before the cameras prior to the next election. Then he can talk about how he made the NFL a better game for America.

Congress did hold hearings on steroids in baseball. Yes, both involved cheating and both situations compromise the integrity of sport.

But steroid use is illegal. So unless there’s information that legally incriminates coaches Gregg Williams and Sean Payton or the others involved, why should government stick its nose in this? What exactly would the senators be investigating? I’d love to see what they find.

The more serious side of this, of course, is the compromised health of retired players who have taken all those hits. If Congress wants to do more for them, well I’m all in.

Please leave your comments here and chat with me on Twitter @lavararrington

By  |  11:27 AM ET, 03/23/2012

 
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