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Posted at 02:24 PM ET, 12/22/2011

Giving up draft picks to get Andrew Luck better work

As the NFL regular season draws to a close, the discussions surrounding the Andrew Luck sweepstakes are beginning. Adam Schefter has been talking about teams that might make a push for the No. 1 draft spot, and of course the Redskins were mentioned as a strong possibility.

Here’s my take on it: The team that receives that pick will either use it for Luck or create a bidding war that will be very competitive and very costly. My feeling is if a team is truly one player away from solidifying its roster, then it should do what needs to be done to get that final piece.

If a team is multiple players away from being good, I think it would be foolish to neglect those needs for one player.

If the team feels strong enough about one player to exchange multiple draft picks, then that player better be everything they thought he would be.

As a former No. 2 overall pick, I understand the pressure that goes with being drafted that high. There were no crazy moves made to draft me, and I wasn’t a quarterback, which drastically diminishes the amount of attention. That being said, I had a productive career, though to many it never lived up to the hype that surrounded my arrival in the nation’s capital because we never truly turned this team around. I would agree to a certain extent; making the playoffs only once isn’t how I envisioned my career in D.C.

And that’s my whole point: When you bring in a high draft pick, fans will expect that player to transform an entire team, and if he doesn’t, he will be considered a bust.

Now take that and magnify it to the highest power, and that’s what Andrew Luck would be facing if he’s drafted by a struggling franchise that mortgaged a ton of draft picks to get him.

His draft story would always be a point of reference in success as well as failure. Luck’s head coach’s job security would be attached to his success or failure, and quite frankly, the grace period would not be long.

That’s more than enough pressure to bring any person to a breaking point, and that’s what Andrew Luck would be dealing with if the Redskins did what they could to get that number one spot in the draft.

It will be interesting to see how this all plays out. One thing that’s for certain: It will make for some interesting discussion.

Leave your comments here and chat with me on Twitter @lavararrington

By  |  02:24 PM ET, 12/22/2011

 
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