Bork-inspired video bill gets update

December 20, 2012

(John Duricka/AP)

The House this week adopted a bill updating the Video Privacy Protection Act, a piece of legislation prompted by one of the ugly moments (of many) during Bork’s failed 1987 confirmation process in which a Georgetown video store clerk shared the would-be justice’s video rental history with a reporter.

There wasn’t anything particularly scandalous about Bork’s videos — his tastes ran to Hitchcock and James Bond flicks — but outrage over the disclosure led legislators, including Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), to push through a bill.

The new bill essentially makes it easier for customers of companies like Netflix to share their favorite videos; under the current law, a company has to ask for permission each time it shares users’ movie rentals, and the update would allow customers to give their one-time okay.

Emily Heil is the co-author of the Reliable Source and previously helped pen the In the Loop column with Al Kamen.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read

politics

Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters