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In The Loop
Posted at 10:24 AM ET, 06/28/2013

Ecuador embassy’s slick pro-trade ad campaign appears scrapped after Snowden spat


Courtesy of a Loop fan.
Terrible timing for a cheery campaign — which includes prominent ads on Metro trains — by the Ecuadorian embassy promoting a trade pact with the U.S.

On Thursday, the country’s government backed out of the deal in dramatic fashion, calling pressure from the Obama administration over American intelligence leaker Edward Snowden “blackmail.” Ecuador is considering offering sanctuary to Snowden.

All of which makes the slick pro-trade advertising campaign, which was launched by the Ecuadorian embassy in Washington, feel a little awkward. On Friday, a Loop fan spotted a sign on a Metro car promoting the KeepTradeGoing campaign.

“I discovered the best roses come from Ecuador,” the colorful sign reads.

The initiative also featured an extensive Web site, according to a news release lauding the launch, featuring “videos, infographics, photos and testimonials from those affected in both countries – from Ecuadorian farmers to the owners of U.S. flower shops,” as well as a social-media presence.

The message is (was?) that the trade deal was pretty much the best thing since sliced bread, keeping Ecuadorians from resorting to the drug trade, while sending the very finest fresh-cut roses, tuna, broccoli and mangoes to American consumers.

“KeepTradeGoing.com serves as a forum for educating, encouraging action, and stimulating a very important conversation: ways that Ecuador and the U.S. can further develop our trade relationships for the economic and security benefits of both countries,” Nathalie Cely, the Ecuadorian ambassador to the U.S. said in the release.

We couldn’t immediately reach a representative for the campaign, but the Web site and Facebook page and Twitter feed appeared to have been taken down.

Awwk-ward.

By  |  10:24 AM ET, 06/28/2013

 
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