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In The Loop
Posted at 04:30 PM ET, 05/15/2012

Joe Lieberman, travelin’ man


Joe Lieberman announcing his retirement from the Senate. (Associated Press)
Keeping an eye on the old Joe-Mentum — the campaign phrase that outgoing Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) used when he ran for vice president as a Democrat in 2000.

He’s not traveling nearly as much as he did then, but he’s on the road a lot.

When last we checked, Lieberman was heading to Israel at the end of December on a one-member congressional delegation. He and his wife, Hadassah, stopped in the Holy Land, and then he and two aides went on in a military plane, to Tunisia and Libya.

We’ve been waiting since then to see what the one-senator congressional delegation (or codel) cost taxpayers. Now we’ve got the numbers.

The commercial flights alone by Lieberman and aides Vance Serchuk and Margaret Goodlander, according to the Senate’s quarterly foreign travel report released Thursday, cost about $28,700. (Sounds like business class.) Add another $5,000 in per diem and “miscellaneous” costs noted in the report.

Then there’s the miljet they used to get to Tunisia and Libya — which is pretty much the only way to get around in that area.

Those planes, assuming they took a real small plane, are billed out by the Pentagon at $3,000 an hour.

Lieberman, who decided against running for reelection in what looked to be a tough race, has made at least two more visits to Israel and the Middle East since that trip. He took a personal trip the second week of April and then a solo codel to Lebanon and Israel that began at the end of April.

An earlier post indicated that Hadassah Lieberman’s travel was paid for by the government. It was not.

By  |  04:30 PM ET, 05/15/2012

Tags:  Joe Lieberman, Holy Land, trips, Israel, Tunisia, Libya, Lebanon, codel, military jet, costs, travel, Pentagon, Al Kamen, In the Loop, Emily Heil

 
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