Most Read: Politics

Read In

Now Viewing: People from around the country looking at Post Politics section

See what's being read across the country ›
In The Loop
Posted at 10:49 AM ET, 02/16/2012

Vitter’s return; vintage Newt; Trump trumped (read-this roundup)


Sen. David Vitter is back, talking about conscience. (Alex Wong - Getty Images)
And hey, look at that! It’s Sen. David Vitter (R-La.), who has kept a mostly low profile since his name turned up among the clients of the infamous D.C. Madam.

But our colleague Dana Milbank notes that Vitter has popped back onto radar screens — he was among the lawmakers Wednesday protesting the administration’s new birth control coverage rule. An exemption for religious organizations “may be good enough for President Obama’s conscience,” Vitter said, according to Milbank, but “it’s not good enough for the conscience of millions of Americans.”

And Newt Gingrich, presidential aspirant, might be very much in the news these days, but in a new documentary about the Clinton era, we see the old Newt whose role was presidential antagonist. Our colleague Hank Steuver reviews the PBS program and finds that Secretary of State Hilary Clinton’s hair today looks mighty similar to her ‘90s ‘do, and that Gingrich, who “isn’t interviewed in ‘Clinton,’ even though he gets lots of screen time,” plays the villain.

Elsewhere, it seems the General Services Administration played hardball with Donald Trump. As part of the contract the hotel magnate/reality star/political dabbler has to turn the Old Post Office into a luxury hotel, the Donald agreed to keep the traditional bell-ringing going, John Kelly reports.

And our quote of the day comes from the story Thursday by our colleague William Wan about Chinese vice president Xi Jinping’s visit to Iowa for an agricultural forum: “These summits are kind of like date night,” said Michael Green, a former White House adviser on Asia. “No matter what happens during the week — and a lot of bad things happen in U.S.-China relations — every once in a while the leaders have to get together and say: ‘I love you, man. Or if I don’t love you, at least I’m going to work with you.’”

By  |  10:49 AM ET, 02/16/2012

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company