wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost2

Most Read: Politics

Read In

Now Viewing: People from around the country looking at Post Politics section

See what's being read across the country ›

Social Surface: Politics

In The Loop
Posted at 12:55 PM ET, 04/24/2013

Weiner touts brochure — but its imagery may not help his cause

A possible political comeback for former representative Anthony Weiner hinges largely on whether voters can put aside the scandal in which the New York Democrat tweeted a picture of his underwear-clad crotch (a recap: the pic was intended for a woman who wasn’t his wife, but instead went public; scandal/resignation ensued).

His cause isn’t helped by his easily pun-able name and his hometown tabloids’ excitable headline writers, as our colleague Chris Cillizza has noted — but Weiner isn’t doing himself any favors on this score, either.

Since returning to Twitter last week, Weiner’s been tweeting links to a brochure he wrote titled “Keys to the City,” in which he outlines ideas for shoring up New York City’s middle class. The 20-page document appears to be a slightly edited version of one he published in 2008, with a few tweaks.

One, smartly, was to remove the double-entendre word “impotent” from the text. But it’s what he left in that may be problematic. The cover graphic depicts an outline of the Empire State Building jutting into the title. Above that central image is a photo of the monument in the center of NYC’s Columbus Circle.

Those distinctively shaped structures may be visual reminders of the ... ahem, anatomy that starred in the former congressman’s scandal.

New York-based graphic designer Rob Arnow says Weiner could have opted to highlight a less-giggle-inducing symbol of New York, like the Brooklyn Bridge or the Statue of Liberty. But at a minimum, he says, the designer might have avoided running text up the side of the Empire building, thus calling even more attention to it.

“On balance, New York has a lot of suggestive imagery in its icons,” Arnow tells us. “I’m not sure that simply using the elements he did is the most relevant thing — I think it’s more the way they’re shown.”

Weiner responded to our email seeking comment, writing only to note that “the logo is the same as was used in an earlier edition of the book.”

True, but that was then...

By  |  12:55 PM ET, 04/24/2013

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company