Washington résumé ‘enhancement’ habits strike again

September 12, 2013
Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) at a Senate Foreign Relations meeting on Syria. (Photo Mark Wilson/ Getty Images)
Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) at a Senate Foreign Relations meeting on Syria. (Photo Mark Wilson/ Getty Images)

Yet another Washington career has been sidetracked by résumé “enhancement.” Elizabeth O’Bagy, a young researcher at the  Institute for the Study of War, became instantly famous last week  when her Wall Street Journal op-ed on intervention in Syria  was drawn on by both Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Secretary of State John Kerry in congressional hearings.

Alas, a few days later O’Bagy was fired by the institute for saying she had a doctorate when in fact she didn’t. She told Politico on Monday that she had submitted and defended her dissertation and was waiting for her degree.

Résumé puffery, major or minor, is quite common, especially in Washington.  Lawmakers often get in hot water for things like embellishing military service: Take Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), whose campaign was almost derailed by reports he had indicated he had been in Vietnam, or Rep. Wes Cooley (R-Ore.), who lost his seat after claiming he had served in Korea.

And then there’s our favorite, California hotelier Larry Lawrence, who died while serving as President Bill Clinton’s ambassador to Switzerland and whose body was exhumed from Arlington National Ceremony when it turned out he had lied about being in the Merchant Marine during World War II..

 

Al Kamen, an award-winning columnist on the national staff of The Washington Post, created the “In the Loop” column in 1993.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Politics
Next Story
Al Kamen · September 11, 2013