Washington can seem remote — even to administration officials

U.S. Parole Commission Chairman and former D.C. Police Chief Isaac Fulwood Jr. (Photo: Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post U.S. Parole Commission Chairman and former D.C. Police Chief Isaac Fulwood Jr. (Photo: Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post

Former D.C. police chief Isaac Fulwood Jr., who’s now chairman of the U.S. Parole Commission at the Justice Department, was struck by President Obama’s speech in July offering reflections on race in the wake of the jury verdict in the Trayvon Martin killing.

So he sent a letter to Obama, whom he’s never really talked to, suggesting that the Justice Department “lead a dialogue with law enforcement about racial profiling.”

He got no response. Not even a Robo-signed “Thanks for your letter.”

Fulwood wrote a similar letter to Attorney General Eric Holder via Deputy Attorney General James Cole (his point person at Justice) with a similar suggestion, adding, “I look forward to discussing this issue in more depth.”

Same non-response.

He wrote another letter Aug. 21 to Cole, amplifying his proposal and adding that he had “reached out to police chiefs around the country” and listed 10 “who have shown a keen interest in a meeting,” including Raymond Kelly in New York, Robert White In Denver, D.C.’s Cathy Lanier and Philadelphia’s Charles Ramsey, Lanier’s predecessor.

Still nothing, though Obama and Holder met  two weeks ago with mayors and police chiefs at the White House to discuss relations between black youths and law enforcement.

Al Kamen, an award-winning columnist on the national staff of The Washington Post, created the “In the Loop” column in 1993.

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Al Kamen · September 13, 2013