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Posted at 05:55 AM ET, 07/01/2011

Mark Zuckerberg is going to tell us something ‘awesome’; FTC digs into Twitter; ViralHeat is watching you; Net Neutrality is almost here


The Zuck promises us “awesome.” But we can’t help being reminded of Facebook Places. (NORBERT VON DER GROEBEN - REUTERS)

Correction: ViralHeat’s first-round fundraising totaled $4.25 million. This post originally read $42.5 million. It has been corrected and we regret the error. Thanks to reader John Robert Reed for bringing this to our attention.

Good morning!

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner wants out — but only after the debt ceiling is raised. Geithner reportedly told President Obama of his intentions to leave, but said he would only do so with the president’s endorsement.

Based on the looks of things, it may be a while.

On to the top five this morning:

1) FTC digs into Twitter’s business practices

Business Insider reports that the Federal Trade Commission is investigating Twitter’s business practices. It appears the FTC’s focus is on the spring of 2010, when Twitter made the announcement that it would be offering “official” services like URL-shortening and mobile applications.

The competition between Twitter and entrepreneur Bill Gross to buy TweetDeck seems to have raised some eyebrows over at the FTC.

(Business Week)

2) ViralHeat is new weapon in companies’ customer-relations arsenal

Companies have a new way of finding out what you’re likely to buy, and it’s called ViralHeat.

The software as a service (SaaS) company provides marketers with a feature called Human Intent, which analyzes users’ social decision-making rather than relying on users’ past actions. The functionality is currently in testing and being used by companies like Dell.

ViralHeat has raised $4.25 million in its first funding round and is described by Venture Beat’s Meghan Kelly as being the “Match.com for businesses and consumers.”

The Human Intent feature could be seen as somewhat stalker-like, since it tracks users’ social media behavior. But in an age where our phones broadcast where we are at all times, how surprised can we be?

(VentureBeat)

3) Net Neutrality rules are almost here

The FCC is apparently very close to instituting the new net neutrality rules — rules that would prevent internet service providers from discriminating against certain content providers.

According to GigaOm, the FCC sent the rules to the Office of Management and Budget Thursday. After that, the rules go to the Federal Register for printing.

It may be as little as 35 days from now before the lawsuits start pouring in to challenge the controversial rules.

(GigaOm)

4) Is Simplee the solution for understanding your health insurance plan?

A new web-based tool called Simplee has landed, and it may be the solution to the arcane rules and regulations that govern your health insurance plan.

Compared to Mint.com’s personal-finance-made-easy tool, Simplee brings in users’ health insurance information (health, vision, dental, etc.) and allows them to track their deductibles and overall health insurance spending.

The company says they expect to have 80 percent of the health insurance market covered by the end of the year.

(GigaOm)

5) Will Mark Zuckerberg blow our minds?

Last but not least, Mark Zuckerberg has announced that he will be announcing something “awesome” next week. We would love to offer more specifics, but the Facebook founder is being tight-lipped as to what this “awesome” thing will be.

Zuckerberg’s hints come in the wake of the launch of GooglePlus — a social network that is widely expected to challenge Facebook’s social media dominance. (You can read our review here).

Let’s hope it’s more “awesome” than his Facebook Places announcement.

(Faster Forward)

By  |  05:55 AM ET, 07/01/2011

Categories:  Business, Entrepreneurship, Health, Morning Read, Technology

 
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