Steve Jobs in 1994 interview: My life’s work ‘will be obsolete by the time I am 50′

June 20, 2013

Here’s what we’re reading/watching today:


Screenshot from “Steve Jobs: Visionary Entrepreneur” produced by the Silicon Valley Historical Association. (YouTube)

1) A previously unreleased video has been posted to YouTube of a 1994 interview with the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. The video was released by the Silicon Valley Historical Association, and is part of a one-hour documentary the Association released on its Web site roughly six weeks ago. The video is narrated by John McLaughlin, the Association’s president. McLaughlin conducted the interview at NeXT’s offices nearly 20 years ago and produced the film. He confirmed, in a call with the Post, that the Association had released the clip on YouTube:

“All the work that I have done in my life will be obsolete by the time I am 50,” says Jobs in the video, “this is a field where one does not write a principia, which holds up for two hundred years. This is not a field where one paints a painting that will be looked at for centuries, or builds a church that will be admired and looked at in astonishment for centuries. No. This is a field where one does one’s work and in ten years it’s obsolete, and really will not be usable within ten or twenty years. … Nah, it’s not like the renaissance at all. It’s very different.”

McLaughlin says he hopes the video will be accepted by iTunes for sale. But, for now, it’s only available via the Association’s Web site.

“Hopefully,” said McLaughlin, “in the next year or two, iTunes will pick it up.” Asked why the film was released so long after Jobs’s passing in 2011, McLaughlin said that limited resources at the Association had stood in the way of moving faster.

2) The world of innovation is vast. It includes potential breakthroughs in the fight against obesity … and the war for short-form video. Guess which one is getting more attention today.

That’s right, Instagram now gives users an opportunity to record 15 second videos and run them through any one of 13 filters. Instagram made the the announcement Thursday at Facebook’s headquarters (Facebook acquired Instagram last year). Twitter-owned Vine isn’t letting Instagram have all the fun. The company offered sneak peeks of potentially new features on the platform, as illustrated in these Vines from co-founders Dom Hoffmann and Rus Yusupov.

The videos appear to show new screen layouts, video storage features and categories, such as “cats,” “comedy” and “science & technology.”

And, yes, Washington Post Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Donald E. Graham is a member of Facebook’s board of directors.

On to story number three!

3) The United States and Italy signed an agreement to explore Mercury together during a meeting in Rome on Thursday. The memorandum of understanding covers the BepiColombo mission to Mercury led by the European Space Agency. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Italian Space Agency President Enrico Saggese also discussed NASA’s new asteroid initiative and Saggese, according to a NASA release, said he was interested in seeing how Italy could be involved. Yay, international cooperation. (NASA)

4) Speaking of space travel, three prototypes of Made in Space’s 3D printers have cleared a key hurdle in their path to International Space Station in 2014. The printers passed key tests during flights where they were exposed to brief periods of microgravity. The printers would be sent in the hopes they could make life in space cheaper and easier for astronauts. These are not, however, the food 3D printers that made headlines a few weeks ago, although both, as Space.com’s Mike Wall writes, are examples of NASA’s seemingly voracious appetite for the technology. (Space.com)

5) And, last but not least (also, since I’ll be taking tomorrow off), here’s a large, fuzzy cat fitting into a tiny bowl, because it’s summer and why not:

(via The Daily Dot)

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