What would you call the ‘Sharknado’ sequel? Seriously, SyFy wants to know.

July 17, 2013

Here are the five stories we’re reading/watching today:

In this image released by Syfy, Ian Ziering, second left, and Cassie Scerbo battle a shark in the Syfy original film "Sharknado." The network is announcing a sequel to "Sharknado," which became an instant campy classic with its recent airing. The new film premieres in 2014. (AP Photo/Syfy)
In this image released by Syfy, Ian Ziering, second left, and Cassie Scerbo battle a shark in the Syfy original film “Sharknado.” The network announced a sequel to “Sharknado,” which became an instant campy classic with its recent airing. The new film premieres in 2014. (AP Photo/Syfy)

1) First things first. the SyFy network has started a competition to name the “Sharknado” sequel. Yes, a sequel (or perhaps prequel) to a TV movie about tornadoes that yank sharks from the ocean and proceed to ravage Los Angeles. The Hollywood Reporter’s Hillary Lewis writes that SyFy Executive Vice President of Programming and Original Movies, Thomas Vitale, confirmed as much in a statement. The network also confirmed on Twitter:

 

The second installment, said Vitale, will take place in New York City. And, yes, you read that right: They are asking folks to tweet their ideas for a film title. Who said the summers were slow news months? (The Hollywood Reporter)

2) The trailer for the film “The Fifth Estate” is out. The movie is based on former Assange colleague Daniel Domscheit-Berg’s “Inside WikiLeaks” and journalists David Leigh and Luke Harding’s book “Wikileaks.” It is scheduled for release on Oct. 18. Benedict Cumberbatch of “Star Trek Into Darkness” and “Sherlock”-fame plays Julian Assange. (Wired)

3) Would you want your skin turned into a computer interface? Lynette Jones, a senior research scientist at MIT, is researching how to leverage skin’s sensitivity to create the next generation of vibrating interfaces. (Wired)

4) Speaking of leveraging the human body, wouldn’t it be great if you could power your cellphone with urine? Okay, maybe “great” isn’t the right word. It’s interesting, at least. Scientists at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory in the United Kingdom have discovered how to make urine power a smartphone. The power source is a microbial fuel cell. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation provided funding for the project in part, which is a collaboration between the University of the West of England, and the University of Bristol. The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Technology Strategy Board also provided funding. (CNET)

5) In other news, NASA is getting an anime mascot for its Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. The goal of the international satellite mission is to give students and educators data about how the earth’s water cycle works. The GPM is partners with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and hosted a competition for individuals to design an anime mascot for GPM. The prize: having your character star in an animated video about GPM and precipitation science. (GPM via Kotaku)

Here are the grand prize winners:


The character is named “GPM” and was created by illustrator and comic writer Yuki Kiriga. Kiriga is from Tokyo, Japan. (Credit: Yuki Kiriga)

This is a more detailed outline of “GPM” created by illustrator and comic writer Yuki Kiriga. The illustration is a grand-prize winner in the competition to create a mascot for the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM). (Credit: Yuki Kiriga)

 


The character “Mizu-chan” was created by Sabrynne Buchholz. The illustrator intended for the character to be the “personification of water and precipitation.” Buchholz is a 14- year-old from Hudson, Colo. (Credit Sabrynne Buchholz)

Illustrator Sabrynne Buchholz also sent in these sketches of “Mizu-Chan”, offering up more detail. The illustration was one of two grand-prize winners in the GPM anime mascot competition.(Credit: Sabrynne Buchholz)

And the adult runners up:

"GPM" by Shinoh Ashibez. The character "is not a mascot," according to a description from the illustrator. "It [represents] the Core Observatory itself. The illustration was among the adult runner-ups in the GPM anime mascot competition. (Credit: Shinoh Ashibez)
The character “GPM” by Shinoh Ashibez “is not a mascot,” according to a description from the illustrator. “It [represents] the Core Observatory itself.” The illustration was among the adult runners-up in the GPM anime mascot competition. (Credit: Shinoh Ashibez)
The character was created by 42-year old Shinoh Ashibez from Shibata-gun, Miyagi, Japan. (Credit: Shinoh Ashibez)
The character was created by 42-year -old Shinoh Ashibez from Shibata-gun, Miyagi, Japan. (Credit: Shinoh Ashibez)


“GPM” by Shinoh Ashibez. (Credit: Shinoh Ashibez)
 
"Aquiia" by Joe Holliman was one of the two adult runner-ups in the GPM anime competition (Credit: Joe Jolliman)
“Aquiia” by Joe Holliman was one of the two adult runner-ups in the GPM anime competition (Credit: Joe Jolliman)
Holliman, 40 from Bowie Maryland, submitted not only illustrations of the character, but a comic storyboard. (Credit: Joe Holliman)
Holliman, 40, from Bowie Md., submitted not only illustrations of the character, but a comic storyboard. (Credit: Joe Holliman)

The high school runners up:

 


“Walter Mar and Alize Morgan” by Nicol Lakomy. (Credit: Nicol Lakomy)

Lakomy, 16, from Garfield, N.J., was chosen as one of two high school runners up for the GPM anime mascot challenge. (Credit: Nicol Lakomy)

“Eli Hamma” by Kauan de Oliveira Gonçalves, aka “Wanderyen Erin”. The illustration was chosen as one of two runners up for the high school category. Erin is 18 from Sao Paulo, Brazil. (Credit: Wanderyen Erin)

And the middle school runners up:


“Gerard Pullsby” by Kielamel Sibal is one of two runners up for the middle school category in the GPM anime mascot competition. (Credit: Kielamel Sibal)

The illustrator, Kielamel Sibal, is 13 from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Credit: Kielamel Sibal)

This is “Ms. Water Drop” by Nicole Bohlen. “I picked Ms. Water Drop because she is what I imagine a water spirit would be,” writes Bohlen of her character. The illustration was one of two runners up in the middle school category for the GPM anime mascot competition. (Credit: Nicole Bohlen)
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Emi Kolawole · July 16, 2013