There goes the house of cards

July 18, 2013

Here are five stories we’re reading/watching today:

This image released by Netflix shows Kevin Spacey in a scene from the Netflix original series, "House of Cards," an adaptation of a British classic. The program was nominated for an Emmy Award for outstanding drama series on, Thursday July 18, 2013. The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences' Emmy ceremony will be hosted by Neil Patrick Harris. It will air Sept. 22 on CBS. (AP Photo/Netflix, Melinda Sue Gordon)
This image released by Netflix shows Kevin Spacey in a scene from the Netflix original series, “House of Cards,” an adaptation of a British classic. The program was nominated for an Emmy Award for outstanding drama series, Thursday, July 18, 2013. The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences’ Emmy ceremony will be hosted by Neil Patrick Harris. It will air Sept. 22 on CBS. (AP Photo/Netflix, Melinda Sue Gordon)

1) Netflix, the movie-rental-by-mail and streaming-service-gone-production-company has an Emmy-nominated original show: “House of Cards”. It is the first Emmy nomination for an online show. The political drama received nine nominations in total, including a nod for best drama series. “It’s beyond our most bold expectations. We were thinking a single nomination would be a win,” said Netflix Chief content Officer Ted Sarandos, “It’s as much a win for Internet television as it is for the content creators.”

Back in February, I wrote that the show, a remake of a BBC television drama and crafted around data gleaned from Netflix subscribers’ viewing habits, left oxygen for talk of whether it could be the future of television. If the show not being panned offered up oxygen for such talk, the Emmy Award nominations are downright nitro to the engine. That’s especially true when you consider that, for the second year in a row, the major broadcast networks were shut out of the best drama series category.

Oh, and don’t forget the three Emmy nods for “Arrested Development” — a once broadcast comedy given new life by Netflix. (Associated Press)

This undated publicity photo released by Netflix shows Will Arnett, left, and Jason Bateman in a scene from "Arrested Development." If Netflix's "House of Cards" and "Arrested Development" become the first online shows to reap Emmy nominations Thursday, July 18, it will be a watershed moment for programs that don't need television sets to make a splash. (AP Photo/Netflix, Michael Yarish)
This undated publicity photo released by Netflix shows Will Arnett, left, and Jason Bateman in a scene from “Arrested Development.” If Netflix’s “House of Cards” and “Arrested Development” became the first online shows to reap Emmy nominations Thursday, July 18,  a watershed moment for programs that don’t need television sets to make a splash. (AP Photo/Netflix, Michael Yarish)

2) On Monday, NASA announced the discovery of a new moon orbiting Neptune. The moon, roughly as wide as the island of Manhattan, was labeled S/2004 N 1 and has yet to acquire a more conventional name. In an interview with Scientific American’s Lee Billings, researcher Mark Showalter, who discovered the moon, said it may borrow from the Greek or Roman sea gods:

“The name has to somehow relate to Poseidon or Neptune, the Greek or Roman gods of the sea. At first I thought that wasn’t as interesting as naming Pluto’s moons for minions of Hades, but after a bit of reading I’ve found some great stuff, and I’ve gotten good suggestions from in and out of the research group. And we are talking about involving the public in this again, but having done it once, I know it’s a huge amount of work, whereas I could just sit down with my group in a room and decide on potential names in an hour or two.”

Read the full interview on Scientific American.

This diagram provided by NASA shows the orbits of several moons located close to the planet Neptune. NASA announced the discovery of Neptune's 14th moon Monday, July 15, 2013. The new moon, Neptune's tiniest, is designated S/2004 N 1. It's 100 million times fainter than the faintest star visible with the naked eye. (AP Photo/NASA)
This diagram provided by NASA shows the orbits of several moons located close to the planet Neptune. NASA announced the discovery of Neptune’s 14th moon Monday, July 15, 2013. The new moon, Neptune’s tiniest, is designated S/2004 N 1. It’s 100 million times fainter than the faintest star visible with the naked eye. (AP Photo/NASA)

3) A new survey conducted by the Pew Research Center finds that, worldwide, people believe China will surpass the United States to become the world’s leading superpower. The Washington Post’s William Wan reports that the survey, conducted in 39 countries, is a confirmation of much of Washington’s conventional wisdom about the shifting balance of power. (Pew Research Global Attitudes Project)

4) Over on Harvard Business Review, Duncan Angove, president of the consulting company “business software and services” company Infor, makes the case for why New York City, specifically its culture, will shape the tech sector’s future. Angove writes:

“A walk down almost any street in Manhattan is likely to involve brushing shoulders with a huge cross-section of professionals. When you put it all together, you have an environment so rich and varied in skill sets and perspectives that Silicon Valley just can’t match it.”

Read the analysis on HBR.

5) If you’ve ever wondered, here’s a look at how the Tesla is made. (via Devour)

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