There’s a giant robot directing traffic in Congo

(Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images )

(Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images )

While red light and speed cameras are increasingly common in the United States, we’ve yet to see machines enlisted that look like actual robots. In Kinshasa, the capital city of Congo, two large robots are being used in place of police officers to direct traffic and pedestrians.

A traffic robot cop on Triomphal boulevard of Kinshasa at the crossing of Asosa, Huileries and Patrice Lubumba streets. (Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

The robot is in action on Triomphal Boulevard in Kinshasa, at the intersection of Asosa, Huileries and Patrice Lumumba streets. (Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

While a traditional traffic light could serve the same purpose, the hulking robot may benefit from an intimidation factor. So how has it been received? Commuter Demouto Mutombo told CCTV Africa through an intrepreter: “As a motorcyclist I’m very happy with the robot’s work. Because when the traffic police control the cars here there’s still a lot of traffic. But since the robot arrived, we see truly that the commuters are respectful.”

(Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

Pedestrians cross under the robot’s watchful eye. (Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

The solar-powered robot is equipped with multiple cameras, opening the potential for monitoring traffic and issuing tickets. “If a driver says that it is not going to respect the robot because it’s just a machine the robot is going to take that and there will be a ticket for him,” said Isaie Therese, the engineer behind the project said in an interview with CCTV Africa. “We are a poor country and our government is looking for money. And I will tell you that with the roads the government has built, it needs to recover its money.”

Isaie Therese is the engineer behind the project. (Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

Engineer Isaie Therese is shown with the robot she developed. (Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Watch the robot in motion below:

TO GO WITH STORY BY KATHY KATAYI AND JUNIOR KANNAHThis picture taken on January 22, 2014 shows a traffic robot cop on Triomphal boulevard of Kinshasa at the crossing of Asosa, Huileries and Patrice Lubumba streets. Two human-like robots were recently installed here to help tackle the hectic traffic usually experienced in the area. The prototypes are equipped with four cameras that allow them to record traffic flow, the information is then transmitted to a center where traffic infractions can be analyzed. The team behind the new robots are a group of Congolese engineers based at the Kinshasa Higher Institute of Applied Technique, known by its French acronym, ISTA. AFP PHOTO / JUNIOR D. KANNAHJunior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images

The traffic-directing robot is huge, reportedly over eight feet. (Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

TO GO WITH STORY BY KATHY KATAYI AND JUNIOR KANNAHThis picture taken on January 22, 2014 shows a traffic robot cop on Triomphal boulevard of Kinshasa at the crossing of Asosa, Huileries and Patrice Lubumba streets. Two human-like robots were recently installed here to help tackle the hectic traffic usually experienced in the area. The prototypes are equipped with four cameras that allow them to record traffic flow, the information is then transmitted to a center where traffic infractions can be analyzed. The team behind the new robots are a group of Congolese engineers based at the Kinshasa Higher Institute of Applied Technique, known by its French acronym, ISTA. AFP PHOTO / JUNIOR D. KANNAHJunior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images

(Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

TO GO WITH STORY BY KATHY KATAYI AND JUNIOR KANNAHThis picture taken on January 21, 2014 shows a traffic robot cop on Triomphal boulevard of Kinshasa at the crossing of Asosa, Huileries and Patrice Lubumba streets. Two human-like robots were recently installed here to help tackle the hectic traffic usually experienced in the area. The prototypes are equipped with four cameras that allow them to record traffic flow, the information is then transmitted to a center where traffic infractions can be analyzed. The team behind the new robots are a group of Congolese engineers based at the Kinshasa Higher Institute of Applied Technique, known by its French acronym, ISTA. AFP PHOTO / JUNIOR D. KANNAHJunior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images

The robot in action at night.(Junior D. Kannah/AFP/Getty Images)

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