Keystone Pipeline Politics and Indian Tribes in Oklahoma

PONCA CITY, OK - JULY 30: In this town northeast of Oklahoma City, there is a statue of Standing Bear, who was chief of the Ponca tribe. One can see the lights of the Conoco Phillips refinery only about 100 yards away. Some Native American Tribes in Oklahoma are in favor of the Keystone XL pipeline, while others are expressing concerns about the pipeline's impact on native lands. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post

PONCA CITY, OK – JULY 30: In this town northeast of Oklahoma City, there is a statue of Standing Bear, who was chief of the Ponca tribe. One can see the lights of the Conoco Phillips refinery only about 100 yards away. Some Native American Tribes in Oklahoma are in favor of the Keystone XL pipeline, while others are expressing concerns about the pipeline’s impact on native lands. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post

PONCA CITY, OK – JULY 30: In this town northeast of Oklahoma City, there is a statue of Standing Bear, who was chief of the Ponca tribe. One can see the lights of the Conoco Phillips refinery only about 100 yards away. Some Native American Tribes in Oklahoma are in favor of the Keystone XL pipeline, while others are expressing concerns about the pipeline’s impact on native lands. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post