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Posted at 05:03 PM ET, 09/28/2013

Should I Buy a V-6 or V-8 Hyundai Genesis Sedan?


(Cars.com)

I'm in the market for a car to use as an everyday driver. I live in the Washington, D.C., area. In your honest opinion, which model of the sedan would you prefer, the 3.8-liter or the 4.6-liter? Currently, I am driving a 2005 Ford Expedition.

Greg


(Cars.com)

Because you mentioned the Genesis with the 4.6-liter V-8, we assume you're talking about a used model since that engine was last offered for 2012. If that is the case, then comparing the relative prices of used versions propelled by the 385-horsepower, 4.6-liter V-8 to ones with the 333-hp, 3.8-liter V-6 should help with your decision based on what you can afford.

If you're going to use this car as a daily driver in a crowded urban area such as Washington, D.C., you should ask yourself how much additional benefit you will derive from having a V-8. Is the extra power (along with additional equipment that comes on V-8 models) worth it compared to what you will lose in fuel economy? In addition, Hyundai's V-8 engines require premium gas, and the V-6 uses regular unleaded.

But if you're talking about a 2013 Genesis and the choice is between a 3.8 V-6 model and an R-Spec with the 5.0-liter V-8, we would prefer the R-Spec, assuming it fit our budget. Not only does it offer more power and more standard features (there are no options on the 2013 R-Spec) but more refinement. Ride and handling are improved on the R-Spec; the V-8 is quieter than the V-6, and there is less road noise despite the R-Spec's aggressive 19-inch tires (the V-6 comes with 17- or 18-inch tires).

The only drawbacks are the R-Spec's lower fuel economy at 16/25 mpg city/highway versus the V-6's 18/28 mpg, the requirement for premium gas and the higher starting price ($47,695 versus $35,095; both prices include an $895 destination charge). Adding the optional Premium and Technology packages to the V-6 model makes it a closer match in equipment to the R-Spec, but the price comes pretty close as well, at $44,195 with destination.

If money isn't a limiting factor, our honest opinion (the only kind we give) is to go for the R-Spec.

Have a car question you'd like us to answer? Send us an email at tips@cars.com .

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2013 Hyundai Genesis Sedan Review
Compare the Hyundai Genesis Sedan 3.8, 4.6 and 5.0
Hyundai Genesis News

By Cars.com  |  05:03 PM ET, 09/28/2013

 
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