wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost2

Most Read: Local

Maryland Politics
Posted at 04:43 PM ET, 04/16/2012

There’s some talk in Annapolis — but no sign of action


Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, center, at a a congressional redistricting bill hearing in Annapolis in October, with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and House Speaker Michael E. Busch. (Patrick Semansky - Associated Press)
Maryland legislative leaders have started talking to Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) about a possible special session — but reported little progress as of Monday afternoon.

O’Malley met over the weekend in Annapolis with House Speaker Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel), according to State House aides. And O’Malley has a meeting scheduled Tuesday with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. (D-Calvert).

It remains unclear, however, if and when the three leaders will agree on how to tidy up the messy end to this year’s 90-day session.

O’Malley spent much of Monday in New York, at a previously scheduled event hosted by New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg (I) that drew leading mayors from across the country. O’Malley, a former mayor of Baltimore, moderated a panel discussion, according to an aide.

Maryland lawmakers adjourned at midnight last Monday without passing an agreed-upon tax package, amid jockeying over an unrelated bill that would allow a Prince George’s County casino.

The failure to enact the tax package will trigger more than $500 million in cuts to education and other planned spending on July 1 if lawmakers do not return to Annapolis and act before then.

Miller and Busch have offered divergent views on the scope of a potential special session. Miller would like the session to include gambling and other issues that were close to passage last Monday. Busch has said even passing the tax package could be difficult.

House Republicans, meanwhile, have planned a news conference on Tuesday where they said they will warn about the downside of a “tax-laden special session.”

By  |  04:43 PM ET, 04/16/2012

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company