D.C.’s booze boom


Proposed changes to liquor laws could make it easier to open bars like Logan Circle’s ChurchKey. (Evy Mages — For The Washington Post)

Should it be easier to open a bar, club or restaurant in the District? That’s what the D.C. Council is now grappling with — particularly the question of who should be able to challenge a business’s liquor license application. Tim Craig explains in the Post: Currently, any group of five individuals can protest a license. A bill sponsored by Jim Graham (D-Ward 1) would limit that provision to persons living within 400 feet of the establishment in question. The switch has set up a battle between neighborhood activists, wary of losing any leverage in booze battles, and local business owners, who are sick of spending thousands and thousands of dollars fighting tiny groups of protesters.

In other news:

Second D.C. Council hearing on school closures went eight hours (D.C. Schools Insider)

Low-income children “must feel like the deck chairs on the Titanic,” says Jonetta (Examiner)

Three charter school chains look to open up 10 new D.C. campuses (D.C. Schools Insider)

It’s only those pesky “liberal white folks” who want to know who financed my turkey giveaway, says Marion Barry (Loose LipsWJLA-TV)

Barry’s “partners” in the giveaway include Chartered Health Plan (Examiner)

Olney teen was stabbed to death over his jacket by District Heights teen who snuck up behind him (PostWTOPWaTimes)

Turkey Bowl disqualification highlights ongoing problems with DCPS residency fraud (PostWaTimes)

And whether DCPS is following its own disqualification rules (WTOP)

D.C. unemployment down to 8.5 percent, jobs chief lets slip (Examiner)

More unemployment fraudsters found in city employee ranks (Examiner)

Employment services offices to be consolidated in Ward 8 (WTOP)

Teen arrested in 81-year-old woman’s beating is DYRS ward (WaTimes)

D.C. formally tells feds it will set up its own insurance exchange (WAMU-FM)

Lower speeding fines mean less affordable housing (GGW)

The urbanist case for keeping the Height Act intact (Atlantic Cities)

Former Metro police chief will helm Amtrak police (Post)

Dry cleaners will inaugurate Boilermaker Shops (WBJ)

Miss D.C., faced with rare gene defect, opts for prophylactic double mastectomy (Reliable SourceDCist)

Sandy damage gives Georgetown canal boat a brief reprieve (Patch)

If House Republican had gotten his way, D.C.’s police chief would not have been accountable to its residents (GGW)

Read excerpts from the District’s shocking “Black Code” of 1848 (Ghosts of DC)

One city, one hell of a party (Revamp)

Mike DeBonis covers Congress and national politics for The Washington Post. He previously covered D.C. politics and government from 2007 to 2015.

local

mike-debonis

Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Local

local

mike-debonis

Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Next Story
Mike DeBonis · November 19, 2012

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.