‘Dark things’ in Forest Hills

Update, June 19: This post originally said Mannina had planned an “assignation” with his co-worker, but there is no basis in court filings or testimony to characterize the June 5 encounter as anything other than a get-together of platonic friends.

What accounts for a rare violent crime in the leafy Forest Hills neighborhood of upper Northwest? Details revealed in court Monday in the case of a shocking home invasion and sexual assault tell the tale of an assignation a day off gone very wrong. The victim and suspect Paul Mannina, co-workers at the U.S. Labor Department, “planned to skip work and spend the day together” on June 5, the Post’s Keith Alexander reports. But when Mannina arrived at the woman’s home, authorities said, he “pushed his way past his colleague’s front door, handcuffed her, sexually assaulted her and left her with such extensive injuries that she required surgery to implant a plate in her face.” At a preliminary hearing Monday, Superior Court Judge Robert I. Richter heard testimony from neighbors who called Mannina a “family man,” and a detective who said Mannina had he recently been hospitalized for a “change in his mental state.” But Richter ordered him held in D.C. jail: “There are some dark things floating out there,” he said.

Update, 10:42 a.m.: Mannina was found dead this morning in his D.C. jail cell, Alexander reports.

In other news:

Top Office of Campaign Finance lawyer has second job, did not disclose it as required (WAMU-FM)

Virgin Islands delegate will give back Jeff Thompson campaign money (Loose Lips)

Eleanor Holmes Norton is still holding on to her Jeff Thompson money (WAMU-FM)

Vincent Gray says city will review the work Thompson’s erstwhile firm has done for the city (WRC-TV)

Frederick Douglass statue’s Capitol debut will be off limits to most D.C. residents (HuffPo)

“Technical glitch” disables D.C. students’ Metro passes (Post)

Kids attack Red Line riders during evening rush (PostAP)

City will resurface 15th Street cycletrack (Dr. GridlockGGWWAMU-FMDCist)

With any luck, the food truck regulation fight ends today (WBJ)

Researchers identify D.C.’s “transitioning” neighborhoods — including Barry Farm, Marshall Heights and Deanwood (WBJ)

Former council candidate Mary Brooks Beatty moves to South Carolina, blames corruption (themailLoose Lips)

Sorry, there will be no official list of doctors willing to prescribe marijuana (Washingtonian)

Police investigate attempted murder-suicide in Petworth (Post)

Benning Gardens residents unfazed by shootings (WUSA-TV)

What David Catania’s 2013 education reform push has in common with Julius Hobson’s 1977 education reform push (HuffPo)

A thorough critique of the Catania reform bills (Answer Sheet)

Time to get the zoning rewrite moving already (GGW)

Community groups rally for Metropolitan Branch Trail safety (PostWJLA-TV)

Thomas Penfield Jackson was the rare judge who believed in his personal right of free speech (Legal Times)

D.C. Chamber’s study undermining living-wage bill is bunk, advocates say (DCFPI)

The bill is “a matter of basic fairness to the people of the nation’s capital,” Vincent Orange says (Post letter)

Ten buildings that changed D.C., for better and worse (Parchment)

Joe Mamo reworks his Bloomingdale development proposal (WBJ)

Meet Paco Fimbres, Vince Gray’s man on the streets (Borderstan)

Thanks to Gilbert Arenas, the Wizards will probably keep on being the Wizards (Sports Bog)

Union Market gets on summer movies craze (Post)

U Street city lot could get open-air market until redevelopment takes place (WBJ)

Watch cyclist get just deserts (DCist)

D.C.’s best wifi network names (PoPville)

Marion Barry is Mr. YOLO (Reliable Source)

Mike DeBonis covers local politics and government for The Washington Post. He also writes a blog and a political analysis column that runs on Fridays.
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Mike DeBonis · June 17, 2013