Marion Barry’s give and take


Barry’s fine is the first levied on an elected official by the Board of Ethics and Government Accountability. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP)

D.C. Council member Marion Barry has earned many distinctions in his long political career. First president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Founder of Pride Incorporated. Four-term mayor. Longest-serving public official. On Thursday, he garnered a new, dubious distinction, becoming the first D.C. Council member ever fined for an ethics violation. In an agreement with the Board of Ethics and Government Accountability, Barry agreed to be censured and pay $13,600 to settle a probe into his acceptance of $6,800 in gifts from city contractors — while proclaiming in a statement that his “character and integrity remain intact.” He still could face sanctions from his council colleagues for the second time in four years, with Chairman Phil Mendelson set to appoint a five-member committee to recommend further action. More from WaTimesAPLoose LipsDCistWJLA-TV and WAMU-FM.

In other news:

The complicated motivations behind the Wal-Mart vote (DofD)

Study: It takes $88,615 for a family of four to live decently in the Washington region (WAMU-FMDCFPIPoverty & Policy)

“If Washington and other cities with high poverty and unemployment rates really want to turn things around, they should embrace economic development” (City Journal)

“Without Wal-Mart and related retailers it supports around, the residents can continue their long treks to Maryland and Virginia for jobs and affordable shopping” (Fortune)

By the way, Marion Barry went on Fox News to discuss his living-wage vote, and it went pretty much how you would expect (Mediate)

Meanwhile, Vincent Orange went on Fox Business — and held his own (FBN)

So what will Vince Gray do? (WJLA-TVWUSA-TV)

Civil rights group: Arrests for petty crimes have “criminalized a large portion of the African American community” (Post)

There’s another reason your Metro train intercom isn’t working: The driver might have turned it off (Post)

D.C. residents say they’ve been defrauded by non-Pepco power suppliers (Post)

Irv Nathan says city can’t afford to change police forfeiture law (WaTimes)

“You can exhale. The D.C. Council has adjourned for the summer.” (Post editorial)

Hardy Middle School principal steps down (Post)

Council voted down fire chief’s redeployment plan unanimously (WTTG-TVWRC-TV)

Significant rise in reported rapes from 2011 to 2012 (DCist)

Still a problem: More than half of D.C. marijuana possession arrests involved no other charge (Post letter)

On immigrant licenses and REAL ID, the “odds look good for the feds and bad for Washingtonians” (Post letter)

Herb Tillery and Barbara Nophlin confirmed to charter school board (Post)

Looks like Adam Kokesh still remain in jail for at least three months (WAMU-FM)

Slain Howard student had had his apartment broken into (Post)

Statehood delegation funding bill gets hearing (WAMU-FM)

Yes, you can take pictures of building permits now (GGW)

Rusted stairs at Rhode Island Avenue stop caused June Red Line disruption (WTTG-TV)

It’s going to be hard to fix a poorly draining section of West Virginia Avenue (District Curmudgeon)

ANC somehow votes to support New Mexico Avenue bike lanes (GGW)

What’s in the bike safety bill just passed by the council (WashCycle)

Faced with huge tax bill, Transgender Health Empowerment declares bankruptcy (Blade)

The latest Cultural Tourism DC walking tour is in Logan Circle (Post column)

Events D.C. is now lead sponsor for Nation’s Triathlon (WBJ)

Judge has to intervene in landlord-tenant dispute over lack of power in Northwest building (WJLA-TV)

Union Market just keeps growing (WBJ)

Taxi Commission and D.C. Lottery are moving to a new Anacostia building (WBJ)

The grounds for the Hine redevelopment appeal (Capitol Hill Corner)

Capitol Riverfront BID exec moves up to Mount Vernon Square (Housing Complex)

Pope John Paul II’s canonization could have D.C. repercussions (WaTimes)

Ice cream truck hijacked in Anacostia (Post)

Fixture of D.C. food scene, it turns out, isn’t much of a booster (Post Mag)

So here’s your boosterism (Young & Hungry)

The Advoc8te may abandon the 8 (CHotR)

Mike DeBonis covers Congress and national politics for The Washington Post. He previously covered D.C. politics and government from 2007 to 2015.

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Mike DeBonis · July 11, 2013