Let the voting begin

March 17, 2014

Pollworkers on the first day of early voting ahead of the 2012 primaries. Expect to see more smiles today! (Alysoun McLaughlin/D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics)

As one of the most dramatic campaign seasons in D.C. political history continues to unfold, voters actually start voting today ahead of the April primaries — albeit not quite as early as planned. Early voting opens at 10 a.m. at One Judiciary Square, 90 minutes later than planned thanks to last night’s snowfall. (Meanwhile, the D.C. government and public schools are closed all day.) That downtown polling place, at 441 4th St. NW, will remain open 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. through March 29, and on Saturday, March 22, 12 more early voting sites will open across the city. All early voting sites will be closed March 23. Curious about how long you’ll be waiting to vote? The D.C. Board of Elections has unrolled a new feature on its Web site, giving wait time estimates for all of the early voting sites.

In other news:

Feds threatened Jeffrey Thompson with indictment before he cooperated (Post)

Gray attorney Bob Bennett: “I’m ready to go to trial tomorrow” (Post column)

Irv Nathan and Wayne Turnage: Nothing fishy about Chartered Health Plan settlement (Post letter)

Post endorsements for D.C. Council: Brianne Nadeau, Kenyan McDuffie, Charles Allen, Nate Bennett-Fleming, Phil Mendelson (Post editorial)

Vince Gray wins Worst Week in Washington (Post)

Gray’s explanation of “Uncle Earl” is still disturbing: “[D]id it not concern Mr. Gray that a major city contractor was seeking to hide his campaign help?” (Post editorial)

Marion Barry goes to bat for Gray, makes campaign-trail appearance (PostAP@Gray2014)

Jack Evans says displacement by gentrification is “a perception, not necessarily a reality, right now” (Post column)

Endorsement No. 2 for Muriel Bowser (Post editorial)

Bowser rises to the top of the post-Thompson LL power rankings (Loose Lips)

Jim Graham to LGBT voters: “[H]aving one of our own at the table counts” (Blade)

Hakim Sutton surrenders to authorities (DofDAP)

Harry Jaffe picks the winners of the Thompson plea (Washingtonian)

DDOT official: “We are probably years away from having a dedicated bus lane on 16th Street” (Post)

Parents ratchet up pressure on Gray administration for charter high school funding (Post)

The Gray record on OSSE is mixed at best (Post)

How the D.C. government can address rising inequality (Post op-ed)

The real path to school reform: “ensuring a critical mass of middle-class students in as many schools as possible” (GGW)

“The state of the District is selfish,” says Clinton Yates (Post)

Anita Bonds, Allen, McDuffie get Chamber nods (Informer)

Why did police union endorse pro-pot Tommy Wells? It’s all about the contract (Atlantic)

Mayoral anagrams, including “neck javas” and “stew my moll” (Express)

David Catania with hair (@anobleDC)

It’s official: Wisconsin Avenue will go back to six lanes in Glover Park (WAMU-FM)

Build a public parking garage on the 1300 block of S Street NW? (Post column)

Virginia Williams memorial service set for Saturday (DofD)

Demencio Lewis, 23, is shot to death early Friday near Anacostia Metro (Post)

Delonte Jackson, 30, is shot to death late Friday in Benning Ridge (Homicide Watch)

Kevin Leonard, 30, is shot to death late Saturday near Benning Road Metro (Post)

Heroin could become “our next big threat,” Cathy Lanier speculates (DCist)

How Bread for the City tries to keep heroin users safe and alive (WTOP)

Meet Metro’s vermin maven, who asks, “Have you ever smelled death?” (Post)

Drug sentencing case is headed to Supreme Court (WaTimes)

School boundary anxieties run rampant in Mount Pleasant (UrbanTurf)

Chevy Chasers ratchet up pressure on developer to save old house (Post)

Let’s call Congress Heights, Anacostia and St. Elizabeths “CHASE” — or not (GGW)

Eleanor Holmes Norton would expand filing opportunities at the Capitol (Washingtonian)

The conundrum of the 12-foot fiberglass Buddha (Post)

Wil Jones, colorful UDC basketball coach, is dead at 75 (Post)



Mike DeBonis covers local politics and government for The Washington Post. He also writes a blog and a political analysis column that runs on Fridays.
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