Eastern Market redevelopment gets court’s okay


A lot next to Eastern Market is part of a longstanding redevelopment proposal set to move forward after a Thursday court decision. (The Washington Post)

Updated 8/31 to clarify Nader’s lack of participation in the Hine litigation

Six years ago, Mayor Adrian M. Fenty and D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Michelle A. Rhee moved to close 23 schools, and none of those properties was more coveted by developers than the Hine Junior High site, on Pennsylvania Avenue SE smack between Eastern Market and the eponymous Metro station. Now, to some neighbors’ dismay, it appears a redevelopment plan might be going forward after much delay after the D.C. Court of Appeals on Thursday rejected challenges levied by a neighborhood group. The ruling is a new setback for those skeptical of public-private land deals in the city — who include famed activist Ralph Nader — but the fight may not be over: A similar adverse judgment in the West End Library case, litigated by the same attorney, was followed by a rehearing request that further delayed the planned redevelopment. More coverage from WBJHousing Complex and Capitol Hill Corner.

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Mike DeBonis covers Congress and national politics for The Washington Post. He previously covered D.C. politics and government from 2007 to 2015.

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Mike DeBonis · August 14, 2014

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