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On Small Business
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Posted at 08:56 PM ET, 05/06/2012

Describe your most successful Twitter campaign

On Small Business has a new feature in which young entrepreneurs will answer common questions about small business owners’ social media needs. The following answers are provided by the Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC), an invite-only nonprofit organization comprised of young entrepreneurs.

Describe your most successful Twitter campaign.


Dick Costolo, chief executive officer of Twitter, takes a photograph using his Apple iPhone before a news conference in Tokyo in April. (Tomohiro Ohsumi - BLOOMBERG)

Dave Kerpen, CEO of Likeable Media: in New York:

We execute lots of Twitter campaigns for clients, including promoted tweets, hashtag campaigns and other Twitter ad products. However, our most successful Twitter campaign for ourselves has been #LikeableChat. #LikeableChat is a Twitter chat that takes place every Sunday night at 10 p.m. EST and serves as an opportunity for us to discuss big issues in our industry with a thousand of our closest friends.

Twitter chats in general are great because they allow lots of people to get involved, share ideas and form connections. It’s an especially valuable experience for our staff because it gives them the opportunity to lead the charge and become thought leaders in our industry. We’ve had entrepreneurs, prospects and even big brands like JetBlue, DKNY and Chipotle get involved with #LikeableChat, and more join each week. We’ve already closed over $300,000 worth of business generated from Twitter chats, and each week we continue to form connections that will lead to new business opportunities. Twitter chats aren’t limited to the social media industry. If your field doesn’t have one, your brand can start one!

Heather Huhman, founder and president of Come Recommended in Derwood, Md.:

For a client of ours, we developed a biweekly Twitter chat revolving around resumes in order to launch a new product of theirs. Although plenty of Twitter chats exist for job hunting purposes, such as #JobHuntChat, #HFChat, etc., we chose to make the chat focused solely around resumes, since none existed previously and their product is for optimizing a resume.

Luckily, our client has an extensive affiliate network, so that certainly helped in securing interesting guest hosts for each chat and focusing on different topics related to resumes. We’ve also reached out to folks we have relationships with and brought them on to host the chat. It has grown immensely since it started and has drawn influential bloggers, Twitter personalities, job seekers, employers and recruiters. It has also helped boost the client’s status and following on Twitter.

Laura Calandrella, founder and CEO of Laura Calandrella, LLC in Atlanta:

I measure success on Twitter by my ability to engage meaningfully with a community of Gen Y women who are ready to make a difference through their work. I have to listen for emerging issues that they face. Beyond monitoring my Twitter stream, I follow the #GenY and #women hashtags to become aware of trending topics. I also share relevant information that supports this generation of women in developing themselves as socially conscious leaders. This includes my business products and blog posts, as well as other trusted resources throughout the Web.

I find that Twitter campaigns that share my own journey, struggles and successes allow for a more personal connection. Instead of positioning myself as the expert with all of the answers, my community gets to know me as a human being walking my own leadership path. This level of vulnerability is invaluable and has allowed me to create deep relationships that extend beyond 140 characters.

The YEC recently published #FixYoungAmerica: How to Rebuild Our Economy and Put Young Americans Back to Work (for Good).

By  |  08:56 PM ET, 05/06/2012

 
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