FPA/Michael Reynolds
FPA/Michael Reynolds

* Sam Stein reports that the White House is bracing for more possible Obamacare problems, which is exactly as it should be, while also offering hard pushback against GOP claims about executive overreach and people losing insurance.

Look, opponents of the law will be making a lot of noise about one alleged disaster after another for months and months and months. What matters is whether the law works over time — and no question, there’s a very long way to go.

* Brian Beutler on the GOP strategy to deal with the mounting numbers of Obamacare beneficiaries: Simply pretend they don’t exist for as long as it’s politically feasible. For the law, it will be forever October 2013…

* Ohio governor John Kasich’s efforts to bring federal money into the state to expand coverage to his own constituents has earned him a Tea Party primary challenger.

* Kevin Drum has an interesting suggestion as to what it would take to get Republicans to give up their dream of Obamacare repeal and enter into serious negotiations over incremental changes to it:

Obamacare could be different if it becomes widely used by the middle class, not just the poor. Republicans would have a hard time resisting middle-class demands to improve the program. But that’s what it will take. And I’d guess that 2017 is about the earliest likely date for Republicans to give up their dream of total repeal.

* As Ed Kilgore notes, GOP presidential primary politics could make this tough for Republicans even in 2015 and 2016.

* Also don’t miss Kilgore on the rock solid certainty among conservatives that Obamacare has already collapsed entirely, and why that makes debate over the law impossible.

* Tomorrow’s GOP talking point today: Harold Pollack has everything you need to know about a new Oregon study that conservatives will surely use against the Affordable Care Act.

* Steve Benen gets this right: News that John Boehner may move nothing more than piecemeal immigration measures isn’t all that reassuring, given that the Senate reform bill is already a compromise between the two parties, and a popular one, to boot.

* Daniel Larison with an excellent post calling on the hawks to be honest about the true implications of their call for more sanctions on Iran, and how American hard liners are helping their Iranian counterparts sabotage negotiations.

* Reality check of the day: John Cassidy on how inequality in New York is likely to worsen, no matter what Bill DeBlasio does, and what that says about the progressive dilemma.

* And Paul Krugman on the fine distinction between zombie and cockroach arguments, right-wing-inequality-denialism edition.

What else?

Greg Sargent writes The Plum Line blog, a reported opinion blog with a liberal slant -- what you might call “opinionated reporting” from the left.