Memo to Democrats: Chill the f*ck out, people


All the howling from worry-wart Democrats led Greg Sargent at The Plum Line to say this morning, “Chill, Obama supporters, chill.” Thank God he said it. Because I was just about to pen a piece motivated by a more salty thought, one along the lines of Samuel L. Jackson’s new franchise: Chill the f--- out, people!

Reading Sargent’s excellent post was almost cathartic. He does a great job laying out why supporters of President Obama need to step away from the ledge. The race between Obama and Mitt Romney has been and always will be close. “This race began as a toss up. It is now a toss up,” my colleague calmly writes. “Barring some unforeseen event, it will remain a toss up until the end. Which it was always going to be from the start.”

Yet, after weeks of missteps by Romney and his campaign and coming off a fantastic convention in Charlotte, Democrats seemed to think the election was over. I warned them last month that the debates could be a Romney reset. And thanks to a listless (okay, fine: disastrous) performance by the president, Romney got the reset he, his campaign and his supporters were praying for.

Romney was on the ropes for months. And, yet, one 90-minute debate has some Democrats racing for the exits. Andrew Sullivan wondered if Obama threw “the entire election away.” To quote my mother: “Chil’, please.”

All the hand-wringing and bed-wetting make me wonder if these hypervocal Dems had any faith in Obama at all. Jim Jordan put it all in perspective in Politico this morning. “That’s my party: Irrational overconfidence followed by irrational despair,” he said.

Robert Gibbs had the best response to all this today on “Morning Joe” when he was asked what nervous Democrats should do: Take all that energy and go to the local Obama office and put it to use calling up voters or going door-to-door. If they want their worst fears to come true, Democrats need only keep suppressing turnout with their incessant hair-on-fire pronouncements.

Jonathan Capehart is a member of the Post editorial board and writes about politics and social issues for the PostPartisan blog.

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